Climate Hits Home

Graphic of a storm cloud engulfing the text "Climate Hits Home"

According to Nature Climate Change, 85% of the world's population has been impacted by climate change. Have you?

"Climate change is visible and noticeable almost everywhere in the world," the study's lead author, Max Callaghan told The Washington Post

In this Planet Forward series, Climate Hits Home, students from the George Washington University reflect on how the shifting climate has affected their environments, their health, and their lives––and how conditions may change course in the future.

How do you move the Planet Forward? Tweet us @planet_forward or contribute to the conversation with your own story.

Hub Content

Trees above the Stanislaus River forest are obscured by smoke from the Lightning Complex fire, in August 2022. (Kay Jewler)

George Washington University
How did my temperate, mild suburb in the Bay Area turn into a record-breaking crisis point of climate change and what does this hold for the future?

(Photo by Jonathan Lavan)

George Washington University
How will rising marine temperatures in the Gulf of Maine affect lobstering, my community's culture, and my state's economy? 
A pick-up truck drives through a flooded intersection during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

A pick-up truck drives through a flooded intersection during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. (Jill Carlson/Attribution 2.0 Generic)

The George Washington University
I used to celebrate flash floods as signals of sleeping in and days off from school. Now, I fear the next Hurricane Harvey.
A vibrant pink and purple sunset envelops the Long Island Sound.

A view of the Long Island Sound from my backyard. (Jane Cameron/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Hurricane-battered coastlines are disappearing due to the climate crisis. Without intervention, my community and the town I grew up in are threatened.
A tea set laid out on a well-lit table.

Pu'er is named after a Yunnan town that is an important tea-processing and trading center in the province. (Photo courtesy Manki Kim/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Will the taste of Pu'er tea, associated with memories of my family in China, remain the same despite the effects of climate change?
A woman, seen from the back, is wearing light blue jeans and a black jacket carries a closed umbrella and is being blown back by the wind. She walks along a coastline's hard-packed sand on a cloudy, grey day.

The author on Crane Beach in Massachusetts on a cold and rainy day. (Photo courtesy Lisa Pemstein)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Sea-level rise is threatening Crane Beach, Massachusetts: An important source of local revenue, an essential nesting site for Piping Plovers, and my life-long happy place. 
A amber sand dune towers over the tiny figures of a group of people.

A towering sand dune in Wadi Rum. (Farzona Comnas/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Jordan's deserts and rocky landscapes have been beloved by Hollywood and cinephiles for decades, yet the country has seen deadly flash floods. How are local environmentalists to respond?
Several neutral toned skyscrapers sit under a blue sky on the edge of a body of water.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York, New York (massmatt/Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/). 

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | I’ll probably never know if climate change caused all that extra pollen that sent me to the emergency room that day, but the science is definitive. Warming temperatures usher in way more pollen.
A white dog swimming in a pond filled with algae.

A pup swims in a pond of blooming algae. Could he be at risk? (Ildar Sagdejev/Wikimedia Commons)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Reoccurring algae blooms threaten life both in and out of the water. How will we break the news to our dogs?
A single beach goers sits in a beach chair in the sand in front of a row of palm trees.

Folly Beach in Charleston, South Carolina (Taylor Heery/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | In many ways, the cultural landscape of South Carolina mirrors the physical landscape. How is climate change impacting that?

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