Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

The Silent Slide
The Silent Slide
SUNY-ESF
In the summer of 2016, a team of researchers were dropped off by helicopter in the back-country of Denali National Park. Like many scientific undertakings, it did not go as expected... One member of the trip was Kyle Turchick. This video portrays... Read More
The importance of stream restoration
The importance of stream restoration
SUNY ESF
My story aims to spread this idea of stream restoration using a specific design, and to teach why stream restoration is important to our environment, and how different measures can be taken to restore a stream.
Environmental impact of the refugee crisis
Environmental impact of the refugee crisis
George Washington University
This video aims to shed some light on the environmental impact the refugee crisis and what we can do about it.
Underwater museum
Underwater museum
The George Washington University
My video explores the underwater museums created by artist, Jason deCaires Taylor.
Girl playing game
George Washington University
A community scrambles as a school sinks into the water.
The Ocean Cleanup founded by Boyan Slat.
The Ocean Cleanup founded by Boyan Slat.
The George Washington University
The Ocean Cleanup is an invention created by a Dutch teen, Boyan Slat. His North Sea prototype uses the currents to passively collect plastic in the ocean.
Jackson State University
Late in June 2016, I found myself tyrannized by the sweltering mid-morning heat of southern Alabama, as I joined members of the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (MBNEP) on a trip to Baldwin County, Alabama, to witness a staggering site.
Jackson State University
When I joined members of the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program on a trip to Mon Louis Island to examine the oyster reef construction just off the coast, I caught a glimpse of a monumental process to save the dwindling shorefront.
Sciencecast: Climate Change Series
University of Wisconsin - Madison
In our second episode, we talk with Dr. Jim Hurley, director of the UW Aquatic Science Center and a UW-Madison professor, about the relationship between climate change and water quality in the Great Lakes.

(Photo by ezioman/Wikimedia Commons)

Sewanee: University of the South; Summer 2016 Intern
The Chesapeake Bay is held in the highest regard, as an almost mythical monument to the natural world — an untouchable ecosystem. But even at a young age, it became clear to me that this was no longer the same body of water that once flourished.

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