Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Lowry Construction Inc.
As a native San Franciscan who cares deeply about the environment, I’m writing with a clean water and energy proposal that I believe would simultaneously impact this and several other issues faced by our state. With 20+ years in the building... Read More
A sequestrated interface run in water at normal temperatures that evolves oxygen on one side and hydrogen on the other, which should be viably up and running in about 8 years. This should definitively defer use of coal, until it can be safely used... Read More
Engineers Without Borders-GT
The Sustainable Solar Sanitation Project is a collaboration of the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Emory University Center for Global Safe Water, and Sumaj Huasi, a Bolivian non-profit organization. This team is working to address the issue of... Read More
The Rio Grand flows through some of the oldest continually inhabited land in the United States. In northern New Mexico, the river follows a deep gorge formed by the separation of the Earth's curst. Because of its wild and pristine state it's home to... Read More
From DC to Alaska, what impact is global warming having on America right now? What's the National Wildlife Federation doing to help promote green job training? And as Dirty the Global Warming Denying Sock Puppet attacks California's climate law,... Read More
A group of tribal leaders from Alaska tour the Gulf spill area and ponder what might happen to their homelands if offshore oil drilling is approved for Arctic seas.
For 10 years, the Ski Area Citizens Coalition has published its ski area environmental report card, a rating system that grades ski resorts across the west according to their impact on the natural environment.
BRISTOL, RI __ Marine biologists seed Mount Hope Bay's oyster beds. Planet Forward (RWU) goes along for the ride.
A one meter rise in sea level will affect 145 million people. I think it is extremely important to illustrate this concept as vibrantly as possible.
Villagers from the small coastal Alaskan town of Newtok have endured extreme weather leading to massive erosion. Though not at fault, this group of some 350 Yup'ik Eskimos is among the planet's first casualties of climate change. They are forced by... Read More

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