Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Tornadoes and hurricanes are dangerous, but they also inspire new innovations in the renewable energy field. New turbines mimic those storms’ spiral rotations, hoping to generate energy cleanly and inexpensively!
The George Washington University
Team First Light from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand travelled thousands of miles to present their solar house, based on a traditional Kiwi holiday home. Bede Robertson and Nick Officer, two of the 26 students involved in the... Read More
Elon University
The unforgettable Sustainable Spencer highlights the innovative sustainable technologies that make Elon university this year's Greens Campus.
The George Washington University
The University of Maryland's Watershed home took first place at the Solar Decathlon 2011. See what innovations took them straight to the top!
American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA)
Inhale, exhale! Unless the air is dirty, that is. Cleaning up the air is a problem that many cities face. The American Society of Landscape Architects says that by planting more trees and creating urban forests, cities can be a cleaner and... Read More
Planet Forward
THIS WEEK: In this week's webisode, Planet Forward's Frank Sesno interviews Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu at the 2011 Solar Decathlon! Chu talks about the coolest innovations, and even wonks out a bit on r-values and building materials. WATCH!
How, exactly, does the dancer react to the dance? In the case of PerFORM[D]ance House, the house dances at the whim of its inhabitants.
National Science Foundation
Over time, warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by gradual cooling. These changes correlate well with the concentration of nitrous oxide found in ice core samples. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were... Read More
WaterShed, the University of Maryland’s entry into the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon 2011, is a solar-powered home comprised of systems that interact with each other and the environment. Some of the innovative features of the house... Read More
WaterShed, the University of Maryland’s entry into the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon 2011, is a solar-powered home comprised of systems that interact with each other and the environment. A home that harvests, recycles, and reuses water... Read More

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