Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | GW Law School
Algae blooms have created toxic conditions in lakes around the world, but is there a way to naturally control them?
The George Washington University
How does the D.C. area manage invasive species? Here's a look at the problems local ecosystems face and how experts and volunteers are tackling them.
 Willamette River in Portland, Oregon

View of the Willamette River overlooking downtown Portland. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
While Portland is known for its progressive politics, the nearby Williamette River revealed environmental neglect, spurring a grassroots energy for reform.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Marine group works with ports to provide cleaner air and waterways through voluntary environmental certification program, offering economic and community benefits.
View from shore of ocean and sky

The new California law will protect the plethora of life beneath the ocean's surface. (Emily Vidovich/George Washington University)

George Washington University
By no longer allowing California's swordfish fishery to use driftnets, the state has prioritized the creation of an environmentally sound industry and stood up against outdated, harmful practices.
Image courtesy of Claudia S. López, PhD, Director of the Multiscale Microscopy Core at Oregon Health & Science University.

(Image courtesy of Claudia S. López/Oregon Health & Science University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
There have been 9.1 billion tons of plastic produced since the 1950s — with no efficient way of getting rid of it. Luckily, a recent college graduate may have found a new solution to combat our plastic waste.
Chicago River
Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
The Chicago River has been used and abused for decades. Learn about the renaissance the river and its watershed is experiencing thanks to the cleanup efforts of the city and groups like Friends of the Chicago River.
Razorback sucker fish held by a biologist

Razorback suckers are endemic to the Colorado River Basin and have been listed as endangered since 1991. Thanks to an intensive breeding and stocking program, numbers of the fish have increased in parts of the river and its tributaries. (Photo by Luke Runyon/KUNC)

Arizona State University
Fish in the Colorado River are a product of harsh conditions. But human interference in the rivers they call home has pushed a few to the edge of extinction. Luke Runyon of KUNC reports.
Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park

Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park in southern Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
Next in our Alaska series: Climate change isn’t just seen – it’s felt. Weather and temperature fluctuations aside, many experience health impacts caused or exacerbated by climate change.
A view in Alaska
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The next piece in our Stories of Alaska series looks at the human impact, from warming climates to microplastics, in one of the least-inhabited places in the United States — and what we're doing about it.

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