Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | The George Washington University
The invention of plastic has transformed human life. Plastics are incredibly convenient, and far more affordable than alternative materials. However, the downsides are overwhelming.
The George Washington University
Environmentalists and scientists have always asked, how can we save our oceans? One solution, aquaculture, instead asks us to look at ways in which the world's oceans can save themselves.
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
A short story about sea level rise and flooding in East Boston.
George Washington University
For many years U.S. water regulation was an issue with bipartisan support. So what changed? And how are those changes affecting our water and wetlands? 
Researcher Laura Mattas climbs rocky terrain
Northwestern University
A look at some of the women doing research in Antarctica and the lingering barriers that were set up to keep them out. Wyatt Mosiman reports for Medill.
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The Chesapeake Bay, known for its beauty and ecological bounty, faces high levels of pollution from agricultural and urban runoff. Now it has a protective Congressional act, backed by bipartisan support.

New York restaurant, Blue Hill, was one of the first to prioritize ultra-local sourcing. (Lou Stejskal)

The George Washington University
To lower their environmental impact, restaurants are transitioning their operations to be more sustainable and climate friendly.

A view of the Danskammer Generating Station in Newburgh, N.Y., as seen from a train traveling on the other side of the Hudson River. (TomKonrad/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Before COVID-19 hit, there was another global crisis impacting people’s health and economic security: climate change. Here's how three environmental organizations are fighting for their communities during a pandemic.

Raw, boiled, fermented, alive, fluorescent, it's all edible, mostly. (Illustration by Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
An exploration of the untapped value of cephalopods and algae in a sustainable seafood diet.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
The pandemic has forced us to reconsider our relationship with the planet we call home. We sat down with global explorer and sustainability travel pioneer Sven Lindblad to discuss what it’s going to take to get back out in the world.

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