Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

A view of the Danskammer Generating Station in Newburgh, N.Y., as seen from a train traveling on the other side of the Hudson River. (TomKonrad/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Before COVID-19 hit, there was another global crisis impacting people’s health and economic security: climate change. Here's how three environmental organizations are fighting for their communities during a pandemic.

Raw, boiled, fermented, alive, fluorescent, it's all edible, mostly. (Illustration by Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
An exploration of the untapped value of cephalopods and algae in a sustainable seafood diet.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
The pandemic has forced us to reconsider our relationship with the planet we call home. We sat down with global explorer and sustainability travel pioneer Sven Lindblad to discuss what it’s going to take to get back out in the world.
George Washington University
A photo essay highlighting a local environmental activist. Joseph Wright chooses to spend his time making a difference by physically removing trash from the Potomac River.
Investigating Environmental Impact of Plant-Based Patties
Investigating Environmental Impact of Plant-Based Patties
The George Washington University
An investigation into whether or not plant-based burgers deserve all the hype.

The Potomac River passes through Maryland, Virginia, D.C., and West Virginia (smartmdblonde/Creative Commons).

The George Washington University
Rivers and their tributaries provide an invaluable resource to humans, supplying drinking water, transportation, and recreation. Since natural resources like water and land can't speak for themselves, how do we advocate for their conservation? With... Read More
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
Where do we draw the line between historical preservation and present-day environmental degradation? In the case of Glass Bottle Beach, where early 1900's garbage bleeds into the ocean with every tide, the line is surprisingly very fuzzy.

David Weedman is the aquatic habitat program manager for the Arizona Game & Fish Department. He and his team dropped hundreds of Georgia cubes into Bartlett Lake this summer to help create habitat for fish. (Photos by Dylan Simard/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
It isn't easy being a fish in the desert in Arizona. But Arizona Game & Fish Department is trying to improve the habitat conditions for the fish in warm weather lakes.
George Washington University
Potable reuse, or recycled water people can drink, can both conserve and generate clean water. So why aren't more cities utilizing this as a part of their water treatment plans?
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Single-use plastics litter our environment, but there’s something we can all do to help: reduce and refuse single-use plastics. Eckerd College took a stand — and so can you.

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