Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Digital Media Producer, Planet Forward
The Ogallala Aquifer is the life source for farming in the High Plains of the United States, but its water levels are in a dangerous state
Osprey on a tree next to a pond at Eckerd College

An osprey on a tree next to a pond at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Eckerd College
Each year, professor Elizabeth Forys leads a group of Eckerd College students in a research project about the ospreys that nest on campus and in the area. This research helps us understand the health of the rest of the ecosystem. 
H2Know App

H2Know is a smart water meter that connects to an app on your mobile device. (Photo courtesy of H2Know)

Georgetown University
H2know is a smart water meter that can help U.S. residents make small changes that have a huge impact.
Northwestern University
Every August, hundreds of fishermen, boaters and spectators descend on the tiny village of Bath, Illinois for a weekend of fun — and to try to catch the most invasive Asian carp.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi live in symbiosis with plant roots and are able to store up to 70 percent of organic carbon from leaf litter. (Mark Perkins/Flickr)

Assignment Editor, Planet Forward
In many cases microbes are already helping the planet in underrated ways. Technological developments and advanced genetic engineering make microbiological innovation a major player in climate change mitigation.

The toxic slag pile leftover from smelting industries sits beside Marquette St. Photo by Stephanie Fox/Medill.

Northwestern University
The clean-up of toxic waste from a Superfund site in a village in Central Illinois has been virtually stagnant for almost 20 years. Read about the dynamics between the community and government in the clean-up process. 
A cyanobacterial bloom in Pamlico River, N.C.
Northwestern University
A new study led by a Tufts University professor predicts that the U.S. Northeast and Southeast will be most affected by the overgrowth of harmful algal blooms.

(Planet Forward)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Planet Forward led a student storytelling expedition to the Amazon. Grad student Tomasz says the Quechua call the Amazon River 'Amaru Mayu,' which translates to 'mother serpent of the world.' What lessons can she teach us?

Dr. Rhett Larson (right) is working to bring sustainable water solutions to the Middle East. (Ashley St. Thomas/ASU Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives)

Arizona State University
An ASU initiative is identifying communities that host large refugee populations and developing ways to make sure they have enough water capacity to assist with their swelling populations.
The Hidden Water Footprint of Food
The Hidden Water Footprint of Food
Digital Media Producer, Planet Forward
It takes a lot more than just sunshine, seeds and soil to produce the food we eat. It also takes a lot of water, and some foods are more water intensive than others.

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