Water

The human body is 70% water. The surface of the earth is 70% water. It is THE most important substance for making life possible. Learn about insightful ideas for using water, keeping it clean and getting it where people need it.

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Marine group works with ports to provide cleaner air and waterways through voluntary environmental certification program, offering economic and community benefits.
View from shore of ocean and sky

The new California law will protect the plethora of life beneath the ocean's surface. (Emily Vidovich/George Washington University)

George Washington University
By no longer allowing California's swordfish fishery to use driftnets, the state has prioritized the creation of an environmentally sound industry and stood up against outdated, harmful practices.
Chicago River
Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
The Chicago River has been used and abused for decades. Learn about the renaissance the river and its watershed is experiencing thanks to the cleanup efforts of the city and groups like Friends of the Chicago River.
Razorback sucker fish held by a biologist

Razorback suckers are endemic to the Colorado River Basin and have been listed as endangered since 1991. Thanks to an intensive breeding and stocking program, numbers of the fish have increased in parts of the river and its tributaries. (Photo by Luke Runyon/KUNC)

Arizona State University
Fish in the Colorado River are a product of harsh conditions. But human interference in the rivers they call home has pushed a few to the edge of extinction. Luke Runyon of KUNC reports.
Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park

Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park in southern Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: Climate change isn’t just seen – it’s felt. Weather and temperature fluctuations aside, many experience health impacts caused or exacerbated by climate change.
A view in Alaska
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The next piece in our Stories of Alaska series looks at the human impact, from warming climates to microplastics, in one of the least-inhabited places in the United States — and what we're doing about it.

An aerial view of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Milton, Delaware. Wetlands, like those shown here, has many benefits for a bay's ecosystem, including filtering runoff, mitigating floods, and as a home to baby fish and invertebrates. (Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

University of Delaware
The health of the Delaware Bay is in question. Human activities, even those at the far reaches of a watershed, can deeply effect a bay's ecosystem. So how can we prevent more damage and work on restoration?
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
We just concluded our 2018 Planet Forward storytelling expedition to Alaska with Lindblad Expeditions aboard the National Geographic Sea Lion. Our Storyfest winners were dazzled by the ecosystems and the wildlife.
University of Delaware
A vernal pool is a pond — but, more specifically, a seasonal one since it typically dries out at some point during the course of the year.

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