Sustainability

Bald eagle nest along the Chemung River. (Photos by Carrick Palmer)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
There’s something about bald eagles. Yes, they are our national bird and their symbology pervades our culture in many ways and places. But there’s something more to them. 
Middlebury College
Building the sustainable home through the reconstructing the nature of being.

A moment with the forest.

Planet Forward Podcast
Robin Wall Kimmerer explains what modern society has to learn from a Native perspective.
The George Washington University
A PSA highlighting the facilities GWU has to offer to combat traffic congestion.
George Washington University
Those involved with environmentalism--activists, environmental policy makers, climate scientists, journalists covering the environment--are increasingly showing signs of psychological problems, and this is yet another effect to the already... Read More
The Silent Slide
The Silent Slide
SUNY-ESF
In the summer of 2016, a team of researchers were dropped off by helicopter in the back-country of Denali National Park. Like many scientific undertakings, it did not go as expected... One member of the trip was Kyle Turchick. This video portrays... Read More

President Trump addressed Congress on Tuesday night. (Source: Video feed)

Northwestern University
Earlier Tuesday, Trump signed an order for the EPA to reconsider a rule that clarifies its oversight of more than half the nation’s bodies of water.
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Is agriculture inherently exploitative and destructive, or can we learn a new way from the traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous cultures?
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Agricultural management can destroy wildlife habitat, but ecological agriculture, like that practiced by indigenous peoples around the world, can provide both people and wildlife with the resources they need.

(Tomasz B. Falkowski/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Ecological disturbances have long been considered destructive, but in reality, can be an essential life-giving force that maintains ecosystem health.

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