Sustainability

George Washington University
While George Washington University has several LEED-certified buildings, what does the average student’s interaction with sustainability look like on campus?
Willie reflects on his personal bartending history.
Willie reflects on his personal bartending history.
Northwestern University
The podcast and accompanying videos describe a distiller's exploration into sustainable methods of distilling alcohol in the jungles of Panama.

Panama’s goat-like cows graze along the road to Kalu Yala. (Emma Sarappo/Medill)

Northwestern University
One sustainable jungle town in Panama hopes to repopulate iguanas in their natural habitat and begin using them as an alternative meat source to cows in the tropics.

Harper Simpson, former agriculture intern at Kalu Yala, wears jewelry to remind her to stay strong in times of hardship. (Cassandra Majewski/Medill)

Northwestern University
In a place so focused on environmental sustainability, an important caveat at the eco-town Kalu Yala is its struggle to create an environment that is mentally sustainable.
George Washington University
Urban trees need our help. One organization working in that area is Casey Trees, based in Washington, D.C.

Reading camp counselor Prisca, 23, teaches students outside of her community school in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. (Victoria Zegler/Save the Children)

George Washington University
Save the Children is using education to achieve Sustainable Development Goals.

Is this image of a landfill with trees and blue sky a photo of nature? (Michelle Arseneault/Creative Commons)

George Washington University
A scholarly debate on nature's definition in light of my experience working with ideas about nature.

(Tony Webster/Creative Commons)

Electricity that we use in our everyday lives has a big impact on the environment.
The George Washington University
We must be wary of science being used in a misguided or false manner, but we cannot abandon the idea of communicating accurate science. 
MPH@GW, The George Washington University
Adaptation and preparedness for extreme weather and other adverse events related to climate change are more important now than ever — but are U.S. cities ready?

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