Sustainability

Planet Forward Podcast
Insects have been part of human diets around the world for centuries — but not in the U.S. Is it time for Americans to consider eating insects to save the planet?
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
In partnership with SUNY’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF), today we launch the first-ever Planet Forward Podcast with our host, Zack Smith.
San Francisco sunset

San Francisco at sunset. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
What will the world look like if science gets lost in the reds and blues when it is most needed? As politics and science stray from each other, scientists must inject themselves into the political conversation to save our planet.
Northwestern University
In the Panamanian jungle, one community is using black soldier flies to eliminate food waste of all kinds. See how meat, dairy, and even bones are rapidly decomposed by specialized larvae. Kira Fahmy reports for Medill.

Biology student Selah Phillips collects algae at the Pacora River. She hopes the oil she has extracted from the algae can be processed into sustainable biodiesel. (Maddie Burakoff/Medill)

Northwestern University
Maddie Burakoff of Medill reports that at eco-institute Kalu Yala, researchers seek out environmental solutions in the midst of one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, but grapple with sustaining their own progress.
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Ecosia

The Ecosia search engine. (Photo courtesy Ecosia.)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Georgetown University
The search engine Ecosia plants trees with partners from around the world with their ad revenue.

The starting point of the hiking trip was at Kalu Yala - a sustainable community in the
Panamanian jungle. (Grace Wade/Medill)

Northwestern University
Fifty miles over four days. Seven hikers left Kalu Yala, a sustainable eco-town in the Panamanian jungle, to trek to the Caribbean Sea and quickly discovered an untested trail and faced other challenges head-on. Medill's Nadine Daher ​reports.
Zoe St. John farm tour

Zoe St. John gives Northwestern University students a farm tour. (Colin Boyle/Medill)

Northwestern University
Medill's Nadine Daher reports that residents and interns at Kalu Yala are working on adding hiking trails around the community to the AllTrails app, which allows you to use your phone as an offline GPS tracker. 
Guna in San Blas Islands

Diwigdi Valiente says that many older Guna people don’t understand climate change, especially since they have lived traditional lives that contribute very little to the problem. (Alex Schwartz/Medill)

Northwestern University
Medill's Jessica Mordacq reports from Panama: The San Blas Islands and Kalu Yala are two very different environments in Panama that both revolve heavily around tourism.

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