Sustainability

A man in a red t-shirt, blue jeans, a baseball cap, and glasses stands with his hands on this hips looking to the left of the frame, standing in a field of grain.

Greg McGlinch owns Down Home Farms, a 450-acre family farming operation in Darke County, Ohio. “I hate seeing soil go down the creek because you’re losing a lot of valuable nutrients,” he said on June 26, 2021. “A lot of that you can’t put a monetary value on” (Photo by Jules Struck).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | Emerson College
Interest in sustainable farming practices is building, and while independent and governmental conservation organizations can be good resources for promoting ecological practices, farmers say that swapping information peer-to-peer works best.
A man and woman in casual attire stand several yards apart, looking at one another, in an agricultural feild surrounded by residential houses.

Decker Woods and Sophia Cooper exchange farming tips in Big Muddy Farms’ biggest plot, July 6, 2021 (Photo by Jules Struck).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | Emerson College
Big Muddy Urban Farm minimizes some of the financial barriers that keep potential farmers from entering the industry, like low profit.
A young woman in glasses and a shirt that reads "America needs Lesbian Farmers." smiles in front of a background of agricultural fields.

Hannah Breckbill, the founder of Humble Hands Harvest, stands near the farm’s vegetable patch, July 2, 2021. “I didn’t grow up in farming, so I didn’t come with any preconceived notions,” she said. “Sustainability seemed like the obvious thing to aim for, as a farmer” (Photo by Jules Struck).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | Emerson College
It's hard for new farmers to find affordable land to buy. A community of Iowans banded together to solve that issue for a farmer in their neighborhood.
A farm, including three tall silos and several buildings, sits on green, grassy land below a blue sky with fluffy, white clouds.

A farm in Ohio, where soybean and corn are the biggest crops, June 23, 2021 (Photo by Jules Struck).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | Emerson College
Farming sustainably is already hard work, and young potential farmers need to be creative to find a foothold in an aging industry.
Tractor in a lush field at sunset
Northwestern University
According to The Nature Conservancy, intense weather will transform hydrology, health, economics, and ecosystems in Illinois, as reported by Eva Herscowitz for Medill.
Arizona State University
Water is a precious commodity that’s scarce in many places across the U.S. but even more so in rural Native American communities like the Navajo Nation, where a virus that requires hand-washing has taken a heavy toll.
Columbia University
The pandemic should be a golden opportunity to change the way we think about mental illness. So far, it hasn’t been.

The Green Bronx Machine teaches students how to garden and produce their own nutritious food. (Photo courtesy of Green Bronx Machine)

The George Washington University
The Bronx is home to many things — Yankee Stadium, the Bronx Zoo, the birth of hip-hop — and most recently, an idea powerful enough to change the world.
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Cities all over the world have a problem: They’ve ceased to be for the people who live in them.
SUNY ESF
After finding juvenile American Chestnuts during a hike with my dad, I discovered the historical journey and possible future of the American Chestnut.

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