Renewable Energy

We're going to run out of any kind of fossil fuels, so we need to move on to a renewable source.

Slender fish handing from a line between wooden posts with large trees, mountains, and a body of water in the background.

Sun-dried candlefish, also known as hooligan, eulachon, and oolichan. (Brodie Guy/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

George Washington University
Today, petroleum is one of Alaska's main exports, but the use of oil in the region goes back thousands of years to the Tlingit people's harvesting of lipid-dense and flammable candlefish. Can this history illuminate a way to a green-fueled future?
Garden bed with green sprouts covered by a dome of plastic sheeting.

A hoop house composed with plastic sheeting and tubes provides cover for a raised garden in Washington, DC. (Lance Cheung/USDA (Public Domain Mark 1.0))

University of Maryland
University of Maryland international Ph.D. student Krisztina Christmon launched her award-winning idea of repurposing farm plastic as part of a university innovation challenge in 2020. One year later, she serves as CEO of Repurpose Farm Plastic LLC.
SUNY ESF
A podcast episode that gives an easy to digest breakdown of gasoline, octane ratings, and biofuels.

The 146 megawatt peak (MWp) Bolero Solar PV plant is located in the Atacama Desert in Chile. (Antonio Garcia/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Today's COP26 theme is energy. Get up to speed on industry topics and then check out some new renewable energy projects that can reduce our reliance on fossil fuels for energy.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
As the world continues to urbanize, there is increasingly becoming a higher need for green, sustainable architecture. One striking example of this is Parc Frederic-Back in Montreal.
Robert Rosner and Suzet McKinney stand on either side of the Doomsday Clock, which reads "It is 100 seconds to midnight."

Robert Rosner, left, chair of the Bulletin Science and Security Board, and board member Suzet McKinney unveil the time on the Doomsday Clock at a Zoom news conference on Jan. 27. Rosner is a professor of astrophysics at the University of Chicago, and McKinney is CEO and executive director of the Illinois Medical District. (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists)

Northwestern University
Scientists sound the alarm on climate change and nuclear risk as the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced the 2021 time for its historic clock, which counts down to a “midnight” apocalypse. Carlyn Kranking reports.
Founding Director, Planet Forward
In our latest episode with PBS's Peril and Promise, produced in association with ASU's Global Futures Laboratory, we meet two individuals looking to the sun for inspiration to move the planet forward.

New York restaurant, Blue Hill, was one of the first to prioritize ultra-local sourcing. (Lou Stejskal)

The George Washington University
To lower their environmental impact, restaurants are transitioning their operations to be more sustainable and climate friendly.

A view of the Danskammer Generating Station in Newburgh, N.Y., as seen from a train traveling on the other side of the Hudson River. (TomKonrad/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Before COVID-19 hit, there was another global crisis impacting people’s health and economic security: climate change. Here's how three environmental organizations are fighting for their communities during a pandemic.
George Washington University
A seminar in Stockholm, which aims to be fossil fuel free by 2040, had this student examining the culture and lifestyle that has a much smaller emissions footprint per capita than we do in the United States.

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