Public Health

Polluted air and rivers have acute local health effects and changing rainfall and temperature patterns cause global disruptions in supplies of food and clean water. Learn what is being done to mitigate the impact.

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent Cate Twining-Ward has been working as a COVID-19 tester during the pandemic. Her experience has made her rethink consumables. (Photos courtesy Cate Twining-Ward/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | The George Washington University
I can tell you, without a shred of uncertainty, that where I am today is just about the farthest from where I had expected myself to be a year ago.

(Photo by Hammer & Tusk/Unsplash)

University of Pennsylvania
Virtual ecotourism is an alternative to travel during the pandemic, as well as an option for better environmental conservation.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
Dr. David Broniatowski, the Associate Director of the George Washington University Institute for Data, Democracy & Politics, shares his research on the misinformation and disinformation around COVID.

(Rosie De La Cruz/Unsplash)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
The farmers market is, if anything, a quintessential unifier for communities. But this year, for many, it looked different.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
With a wave of COVID-19 infections plaguing the country, questions on what needs to be done in the coming months to save lives are at the forefront of national conversations.

A view of the Danskammer Generating Station in Newburgh, N.Y., as seen from a train traveling on the other side of the Hudson River. (TomKonrad/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Before COVID-19 hit, there was another global crisis impacting people’s health and economic security: climate change. Here's how three environmental organizations are fighting for their communities during a pandemic.

(Aleksey Kuprikov/Pexels)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Ecologists and epidemiologists have been predicting a pandemic like COVID-19 for years, revealing the deep-seated relationships between animal health, human health, and planetary health. 

Customers walk through the Dupont FRESHFARM Market in Washington, D.C., which has been open throughout the pandemic under public health restrictions. (Lizzie Stricklin/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
Deemed essential services, D.C. farmers markets have remained open since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic – but in order to keep vendors, staff and customers safe, markets have had to make sudden changes.
Smoke plume and evacuation from the 2018 Woolsey Fire

The smoke plume from the fast-moving Woolsey Fire encroaching on Malibu on Nov. 9, 2018, as residents evacuate along the Pacific Coast Highway. (Cyclonebiskit/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
California's wildfires get worse year after year. Air quality, home evacuations, structure damage, and a whole host of issues plague the state each year. And none of us are surprised.

Lancaster Central Market in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, faced drastic customer reductions at the beginning of the pandemic, resulting in the closure of several stands, and yet most still endure. (Jared Kofsky/PlaceNJ.com/Creative Commons)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Franklin & Marshall College
Why do people continue to go hungry in one of the wealthiest nations in the world? And what can we do about the food system to prevent this from happening?

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