Politics & Policy

Not just talk: policy leads to law which leads to action, but the politics behind going green are complicated.

Greta Thunberg at the Climate Strike in New York

Greta Thunberg on Friday, Sept. 20, during her closing speech for the Climate Strike in New York. (Elina Mariutsa/Northeastern University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northeastern University
With the goal of motivating world leaders, young people have drawn universal attention to global warming in ways that decades of scientific progress could not. 

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured these images of several fires burning in the states of Rondônia, Amazonas, Pará, and Mato Grosso on August 11 and August 13, 2019. (NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership)

Cal State LA
A longtime opponent of environmental advocacy, the personal politics of Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro have made him an international liability. 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, center, speaks about Green New Deal with Sen. Ed Markey, right, in front of the Capitol Building in February 2019. (Senate Democrats/Creative Commons)

SUNY College at Brockport
The Green New Deal, co-sponsored by freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., is a proposed series of new laws and programs to both help combat climate change and social inequity.

A protester with the youth-led Sunrise Movement called for Democrats to support the formation of a Select Committee to advance a Green New Deal to address climate change at a demonstration in December 2018. (Peg Hunter/Creative Commons)

SUNY College at Brockport
Even though every major Democratic candidate has told their base that climate change is a serious threat, they each have their unique take on how to deal with the issue. 

A homeless encampment in Seattle from 2018. (David Lee/Flickr)

Seattle, WA
When I leave my apartment in the Chinatown neighborhood of Seattle I see lush green trees, the VA medical building sitting atop a hill, Mt. Rainer off in the distance, and a man with all of his possessions in a rundown van. 

Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee voted repeatedly to reject Republican amendments to bills that would limit mining around the Grand Canyon and slow uranium mining, before voting to pass the bills out of committee Wednesday. (Miranda Faulkner/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
Democratic lawmakers beat back a series of Republican amendments before advancing bills to restrict mining around the Grand Canyon and on other tribal lands, Miranda Faulkner reports.

Not unsurprisingly, Democrats and Republicans had opposing views at a House subcommittee meeting Thursday on the future of coal in the United States. (Noah Broder/Medill)

Northwestern University
Medill's Noah Broder reports from a House hearing, which looked at the value of coal to our economy. Dems called for more environmental controls, while the GOP stressed its importance to our energy infrastructure.

Despite an increase in extreme weather, like that of 2012's superstorm Sandy, research tends to suggest that extreme weather does not have a lasting impact on public opinion. Shown here are areas of Long Island, N.Y., following Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30, 2012. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Rob Simpson/U.S. Coast Guard)

Planet Forward Reporter | SUNY Purchase
Jeremy Deaton, a journalist for Nexus Media News and creator of Climate Chat, talked with Planet Forward about navigating climate change deniers, conservative interest in the environment, and climate policy.

In 1987, Congress designated Yucca Mountain in the Nevada desert as the permanent repository for all U.S. nuclear waste, and spent $15 billion on the site throughout the years. But facing strong local opposition, the site was never put into use and the project was abandoned. (White House photo)

Northwestern University
A bipartisan group of senators revives the longstanding issue of where to store and dispose of nuclear waste with a new bill proposing centralized interim storage, reports Medill's Kimberly Jin.
The Florida Everglades

The Everglades play an important part in the water cycle of South Florida. (U.S. National Park Service)

Planet Forward Reporter | SUNY Purchase
Florida's population is growing — and so is its demand for water. What can the Sunshine State do to bolster its freshwater reserves and restore balance to its ecosystem?

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