Oceans

Image shows diver holding camera swimming in the ocean, looking ahead.

This is an early prototype of the camera. Research divers will be able to use GPS to create accurate maps that can be compared point-by-point over time. (Illustration courtesy of Richard Vevers/The Ocean Agency)

University of Rhode Island
Inspired by 360-degree cameras utilized by Google Street view, the Ocean Agency developed the Hammerhead Camera, a similar camera designed to be used in an underwater environment, according to Richard Vevers, Ocean Agency founder and CEO.
Man in cap stands on a pier holding a fishing rod, the line of which is cast into a body of blue water under a blue sky with white clouds.

Fisherman Mark Brooks fishes off the Sunshine Skyway North Pier. Mark is just one example of how fishing fosters community and sustainability. (Carter Weinhofer/Eckerd College)

Planet Forward Sr. Correspondent | Eckerd College
With an increasing demand for waterfront properties and the growing impact of climate change, fishing communities are in danger; but, the societal and economic roles filled by fishing are irreplaceable.
A green tinted body of water surrounded by foliage and rock wall under a roof that resembles that of a green house.

The 700,000-gallon model of the ocean sits inside Biosphere 2, a glass-enclosed research facility near Tucson, Arizona, where scientists carry out large-scale experiments (Photo by Hannah Johnson/El Inde).

UA School of Journalism
You’re standing on a beach. Warm sunlight streams down, filtering through not just clouds but a geometric glass walls and ceiling. Welcome to the Biosphere 2 Ocean. Hannah Johnson reports for El Inde. 
Three green and blue-faced salmon are shown close to the camera whilst swimming through clear water.

Pacific sockeye salmon during the annual migration. The Canadian government recently announced its (CAD) $647 million Pacific Salmon Strategy Initiative. “Hopefully it’s not too little, too late,” says marine campaigner Emmie Page (Image by Oregon State University/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en). 

Northwestern University
In June 2021, a heat wave spread over the Pacific Northwest, with people in the region wilting from record high temperatures. But, Fiona Skeggs reports, the threats are soaring for rivers and marine life as well.
George Washington University
Marine scientists are using information collected by everyday people to monitor sharks in the face of climate change.
George Washington University
Scientists recently identified an infectious cyanobacterium as the origin of vacuolar myelinopathy, a lethal neurological disease in wildlife.
Planet Forward Correspondent | University of San Diego
Correspondent Maggie Scholle observes a grunion run, a seasonal phenomenon of fish spawning that lines the Southern California coast.
The George Washington University
Environmentalists and scientists have always asked, how can we save our oceans? One solution, aquaculture, instead asks us to look at ways in which the world's oceans can save themselves.
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
A short story about sea level rise and flooding in East Boston.
George Washington University
For many years U.S. water regulation was an issue with bipartisan support. So what changed? And how are those changes affecting our water and wetlands? 

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