Oceans

A view in Alaska
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The next piece in our Stories of Alaska series looks at the human impact, from warming climates to microplastics, in one of the least-inhabited places in the United States — and what we're doing about it.
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
We just concluded our 2018 Planet Forward storytelling expedition to Alaska with Lindblad Expeditions aboard the National Geographic Sea Lion. Our Storyfest winners were dazzled by the ecosystems and the wildlife.
George Washington University
After declining to about 10% of its population over the last century, the hawksbill sea turtle in Belize is on the rise again thanks to expanded legal protections.
University of Hawaii at Manoa
In order to proactively conserve the environment, students at the University of Hawai'i use psycho-social research techniques to address the root causes of environmental issues.

The lemon shark's yellow coloring serves as a camouflage when swimming over the sandy seafloor in its coastal habitat. (Creative Commons)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Georgetown University
Sharks are among some of the most threatened fishes in the world’s oceans. I spent a semester at the Bahamas' Cape Eleuthera Institute to help catch baby lemon sharks for research.
SUNY Oswego
Every month, Oceans Campus, an internship program located in Mossel Bay South Africa, goes down to Mossel Bay's point and cleans.
The George Washington University
Home to more than 4,000 fish species and countless other marine wildlife, coral reefs not only provide habitats, but also are critical to fishing industries that local communities around the world depend on.
The George Washington University
A new idea to address the rise in sea level.
The George Washington University
Rising sea levels call for innovative ways to protect cities from extreme flooding.

Pages