Oceans

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
There is more then just plastic in the great pacific garbage patch.
George Washington University
When I arrived in Hampton, Virginia, I met with Jamie Chapman, who has lived in the area for 20 years. Chapman is proud of his waterfront home, which he bought 1998 after the cottage survived double northeasters.
Microplastics infotext
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Even when most microplastics are consumed by smaller marine species, no animal—including humans—is immune to its risks as it rises through the food chain.
Planet Forward Correspondent | GW Law School
Despite the devastating impacts of colonization, the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians have persevered in restoring their ecosystem and culture. Learn how the Kashia have lived in and managed the Sonoma County coastal environment for centuries.

In January, Berkeley, Calif., passed a 25-cent tax on disposable cups. (Miriam Gordon)

George Washington University
Recycling is not the answer — not anymore. Here's how a circular economy can both reduce waste and lessen the climate crisis — and why we need to change our mindset now.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Marine group works with ports to provide cleaner air and waterways through voluntary environmental certification program, offering economic and community benefits.
View from shore of ocean and sky

The new California law will protect the plethora of life beneath the ocean's surface. (Emily Vidovich/George Washington University)

George Washington University
By no longer allowing California's swordfish fishery to use driftnets, the state has prioritized the creation of an environmentally sound industry and stood up against outdated, harmful practices.
Image courtesy of Claudia S. López, PhD, Director of the Multiscale Microscopy Core at Oregon Health & Science University.

(Image courtesy of Claudia S. López/Oregon Health & Science University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
There have been 9.1 billion tons of plastic produced since the 1950s — with no efficient way of getting rid of it. Luckily, a recent college graduate may have found a new solution to combat our plastic waste.
A view in Alaska
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The next piece in our Stories of Alaska series looks at the human impact, from warming climates to microplastics, in one of the least-inhabited places in the United States — and what we're doing about it.
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 

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