Oceans

A woman, seen from the back, is wearing light blue jeans and a black jacket carries a closed umbrella and is being blown back by the wind. She walks along a coastline's hard-packed sand on a cloudy, grey day.

The author on Crane Beach in Massachusetts on a cold and rainy day. (Photo courtesy Lisa Pemstein)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Sea-level rise is threatening Crane Beach, Massachusetts: An important source of local revenue, an essential nesting site for Piping Plovers, and my life-long happy place. 
Fashion designer, Ngwane Liz poses while wearing one of her garments.

Fashion designer, Ngwane Liz poses at Down Beach Limbe wearing an up-cycled dress from her "NWF" collection. (No Waste Factory)

Mandela Washington Fellow
The cost of staying fashionable goes beyond the price tag to the environment. Sustainable Fashion designer Ngwane Liz is reversing the fast fashion trend by patching pieces of tossed clothes into new garments.

(Alan Vernon/flickr)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Ithaca College
HappyWhale, a website created in 2015, uses a unique algorithm to identify and track humpback whales. It relies on photographs from ordinary people to further scientific research.
A wave breaks on a dark blue ocean, unleashing a cascade of white foam.

(Ivan Bandura/Unsplash)

Georgetown University
Traditional Indigenous mariculture practices are easier on the environment and sustainably produce delicious seafood.
A small white boat rests buoyed on clear, blue-green waters under a cloudy blue sky with a gentle mountain in the distance.

The shores of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritus, as seen from Île aux Aigrettes, one of the most prominent reserves in the Indian Ocean, on July 21, 2022. Almost two years prior, this water was blackened by an oil spill from the MV Wakashio. (Zoey England/University of Connecticut)

University of Connecticut
This July marks two years since the MV Wakashio oil spill. Though environmental NGOs have left the island and news coverage of the disaster has ceased, youth around Mauritius are still reeling from the effects of the tragedy.
Yellow leaves of kelp swaying in a blue ocean.

(Oleksandr Sushko/Unsplash)

Georgetown University
How making kelp commonplace in our diets and adapting harvested biomass into various materials will help both humans and the planet.
Man stands in water holding a bushel of oysters in a net.

Michael Doall holds a bag of oysters in Shinnecock Bay, Long Island in the fall of 2021. He was part of an oyster reef monitoring project that also involved setting up a predator exclusion experiment to evaluate the effects of predation on hard clam restoration efforts. (Courtesy of Michael Doall)

Georgetown University
Through regenerative aquaculture, Michael Doall is using the ecosystem services of oysters and kelp to clean up our oceans and our plates.
A researcher points out coral polyps growing on a net-like structure.

A researcher points out coral polyps growing at ONDA’s on-shore nursery facility in Florida. (Image courtesy of ONDA Design)

Northwestern University
ONDA Design is working to counteract coral disease and bleaching by developing technology for coral restoration and rehabilitation, Catherine Odom reports.
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
This video is a picture book come to life, with original designs and watercolor paintings made to present the topic of coastal degradation in an eye-catching and engaging way. 
Image shows diver holding camera swimming in the ocean, looking ahead.

This is an early prototype of the camera. Research divers will be able to use GPS to create accurate maps that can be compared point-by-point over time. (Illustration courtesy of Richard Vevers/The Ocean Agency)

University of Rhode Island
Inspired by 360-degree cameras utilized by Google Street view, the Ocean Agency developed the Hammerhead Camera, a similar camera designed to be used in an underwater environment, according to Richard Vevers, Ocean Agency founder and CEO.

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