Natural Disasters

Storms are getting bigger. Droughts are getting longer. As the climate changes, natural disasters are ramping up - here's how we're dealing with them, trying to prevent the worst consequences and learning how to clean up after them.

Waves completely overtake the road, sidewalk, and mailboxes
George Washington University
Growing up in a beach house in a town that comes alive in the summer was paradise. But it will soon be paradise submerged.

Dr. Dhamma Rakkhita believes we can fight climate change with our minds and by channeling positivity.

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
A Buddhist Monk in Myanmar believes we can fight climate change through the power of mindfulness and positivity.
Pod for the Planet
SUNY Plattsburgh
This episode introduces a short series of interviews about the flooding issue in the Lake Champlain basin.
George Washington University
Each year, as temperatures continue to rise, so does the frequency of natural disasters. This short video looks at the faces impacted by this change.
SUNY-ESF
A conversation about living through a wildfire and what comes next, based on a collection of individual stories.
Hurricane Maria satellite image

A satellite image of Hurricane Maria from Sept. 20, 2017. (Processed by Antti Lipponen/Creative Commons)

SUNY College at Brockport
Members of the American Society of Civil Engineers come together to show support for the islands struggling with severe weather.

Low-lying areas on Sapelo Island like Alligator Pond are susceptible to increased flooding during hurricanes and tidal surges. (Evan Barnard/University of Georgia)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Georgia
Hidden ecological and agricultural treasures lie off the coast of Georgia in Sapelo Island, where a group of African descendants have lived for centuries.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who is one of nine senators to co-sponsor the Green New Deal, spoke at a press conference on Thursday, March 14. Joining him to speak was fellow Oregonian, Democrat Sen. Jeff Merkley. (Dan Rosenzweig-Ziff/Medill)

Northwestern University
Americans are increasingly concerned that climate change is both real and manmade, and major fossil fuel industries are heeding the change in public sentiment by investing in green energy.
George Washington University
When I arrived in Hampton, Virginia, I met with Jamie Chapman, who has lived in the area for 20 years. Chapman is proud of his waterfront home, which he bought 1998 after the cottage survived double northeasters.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Water management is not always thought of as an international issue, but for unique watersheds like Lake Champlain, flood mitigation has become a concern for all area locals, regardless of borders.

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