Natural Disasters

Storms are getting bigger. Droughts are getting longer. As the climate changes, natural disasters are ramping up - here's how we're dealing with them, trying to prevent the worst consequences and learning how to clean up after them.

A roadway in Kashmir is flooded with brown water reaching up to the bumpers of a car.

This is a photo taken by my uncle, Irfan Shahmiri. He is the founder of an organization called CHINAR International which provides humanitarian and disaster relief to Kashmiri families. (Irfan Shahmir)

George Washington University
The recent floods in Pakistan are personal to me because I know what it's like to have your homeland be devastated by a disaster. Here's why you should care too.
A small white boat rests buoyed on clear, blue-green waters under a cloudy blue sky with a gentle mountain in the distance.

The shores of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritus, as seen from Île aux Aigrettes, one of the most prominent reserves in the Indian Ocean, on July 21, 2022. Almost two years prior, this water was blackened by an oil spill from the MV Wakashio. (Zoey England/University of Connecticut)

University of Connecticut
This July marks two years since the MV Wakashio oil spill. Though environmental NGOs have left the island and news coverage of the disaster has ceased, youth around Mauritius are still reeling from the effects of the tragedy.
Orange and red fires burns up from browning green grass below under a smokey blue sky.

(Matthias Fischer/Pixabay)

George Washington University
Wildfires are increasing in severity as climate change worsens, and our forests may not be able to grow back like they once could, scientists say.
A field of shrubs under a cloudy sky.

Clouds hang low over Beaufort West, South Africa (Jaunita Swart/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Have we finally cracked the code on controlling the weather? A recent paper suggests that by using drones to charge up the water droplets in clouds, we can cause them to fall as rain.
Two individuals perched contemplatively on a rocky pier.

Hammonasset Beach State Park, Madison, Connecticut (2021) (Zoey England/University of Connecticut).

University of Connecticut
Although ecoanxiety impacts all ages, its influences are disproportionately felt among young people. These feelings, compounded in many by COP26’s resolution, make prioritizing mental well-being as a climate activist paramount.
A suburban street flooded with water.

A neighborhood street in Hampton, Virginia, following a flash flood in 2020. (Aileen Devlin/Virginia Sea Grant https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | On just one day in Virginia, I experienced a severe thunderstorm watch, a flash flood warning, a tornado warning, and a state of emergency. What is going on?
Tractor in a lush field at sunset
Northwestern University
According to The Nature Conservancy, intense weather will transform hydrology, health, economics, and ecosystems in Illinois, as reported by Eva Herscowitz for Medill.

California farmworkers have had to endure heatwaves, wildfires and a pandemic that continues to spread during peak harvest season for almonds and wine grapes. (Photo courtesy of UFW/United Farm Workers)

Arizona State University
The race to deliver fresh foods during peak harvest season means farmworkers are facing the threats of climate change acceleration and COVID-19.
Founding Director, Planet Forward
As climate change worsens wildfires, what can the U.S. learn from Australia's fires?
The bridge in Ellicott City among debris after the flooding in 2016.

The Ellicott City bridge among debris and boarded-up shop doors after the devastating 2016 flood (Photo Courtesy of Preservation Maryland/Creative Commons).

George Washington University
The community of Ellicott City, MD is working together to protect against future devastating floods.

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