Natural Disasters

Storms are getting bigger. Droughts are getting longer. As the climate changes, natural disasters are ramping up - here's how we're dealing with them, trying to prevent the worst consequences and learning how to clean up after them.

Low-lying areas on Sapelo Island like Alligator Pond are susceptible to increased flooding during hurricanes and tidal surges. (Evan Barnard/University of Georgia)

University of Georgia
Hidden ecological and agricultural treasures lie off the coast of Georgia in Sapelo Island, where a group of African descendants have lived for centuries.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who is one of nine senators to co-sponsor the Green New Deal, spoke at a press conference on Thursday, March 14. Joining him to speak was fellow Oregonian, Democrat Sen. Jeff Merkley. (Dan Rosenzweig-Ziff/Medill)

Northwestern University
Americans are increasingly concerned that climate change is both real and manmade, and major fossil fuel industries are heeding the change in public sentiment by investing in green energy.
George Washington University
When I arrived in Hampton, Virginia, I met with Jamie Chapman, who has lived in the area for 20 years. Chapman is proud of his waterfront home, which he bought 1998 after the cottage survived double northeasters.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Water management is not always thought of as an international issue, but for unique watersheds like Lake Champlain, flood mitigation has become a concern for all area locals, regardless of borders.
local transportation is via boat

Traveling on boats is the main mode of transportation between islands of Guna Yala, and most are operated by local Guna people. (Luodan Rojas/Medill)

Northwestern University
Separated by miles of ocean and a 2-hour drive, or a 50-mile hike, through the jungle, Guna Yala and Kalu Yala are two of Panama’s most sustainable communities, but they also are starkly different. Medill's Luodan Rojas reports.

The town of Juan Asencio in the mountain region of Aguas Buenas suffered severe damage from Hurricane Maria, and many homes in the area are still without power. (Hannah Wiley/Medill)

Northwestern University
Puerto Rico's island-wide blackout Wednesday demonstrates how vulnerable the energy infrastructure remains nearly seven months after the hurricane. How can an entire island still suffer from power volatility? 
The University of Mississippi
The National Center for Computational Hydroscience and Engineering at the University of Mississippi conducts research on natural disasters, erosion, dam simulations, and much more.
Solar panels

Solar cells could help Puerto Rico build a new energy grid to end dependency on fossil fuels. (Pixabay)

Elon University
In the aftermath of a devastating hurricane, Puerto Rico faces a challenges to reinvent their power system. Pushes for renewables are embraced by locals. 
13.6 million Olympic-sized swimming pools
State University College at Buffalo
By comparing Harvey to other natural disasters, we can see that this unfortunately ordinary occurrence has become extraordinary.
Storm surge

Storm surges during Hurricane Sandy. (Master Sgt. Mark Olsen/Flickr)

Rutgers University—New Brunswick
As coastal and inland communities alike grapple with the implications of costlier floods and a lack of flood-proof infrastructure, governments have increasingly turned to purchasing and vacating flood-prone properties.

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