Green Living

A lot of simple, seemingly insignificant things can add up to a positive and meaningful global change. PF Members have solutions to living a more sustainable day to day life.

SUNY ESF
The evolution of a program designed to provide fresh food to those facing food insecurities.

Wrapped in the sacred orange robes of a Buddhist monk, this ordained tree is protected from deforestation because of its religious meaning. (Kiley Price/Wake Forest University)

Wake Forest University
Buddhist monks are using rituals and their prominent position in society to help with Thailand's environmental movement.
George Washington University
While plastic straw bans may seem like an easy, simple way for localities to fight climate change, these bans have other implications that directly impact the daily lives of people with physical disabilities.
Eckerd College
"Reborn" is a short film that I created to encourage protection, conservation and preservation for the Earth starting with the simple idea of up-cycling within a college community.
The George Washington University
Why do we need to buy a cucumber that is wrapped in cling wrap, when it is already wrapped by nature?
George Washington University
Taking a look at DC's new electric bus fleet to see if it's the "ride of the future."
University of Wisconsin, Madison
A solution to the negative environmental impacts of shipping food around the world, such as carbon emissions, is to eat food naturally grown in a closer proximity to where you live.
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | GW Law School
Despite the devastating impacts of colonization, the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians have persevered in restoring their ecosystem and culture. Learn how the Kashia have lived in and managed the Sonoma County coastal environment for centuries.

From Andapa, the distant peaks of Marojejy National Park tower in the northeast, while a view to the southwest mounts Madagascar National Park’s Anjanaharibe-Sud Reserve on the horizon. Both parks are pockets of intact primary forest which house incredible biodiversity. (Vanessa Moss/Sewanee)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Sewanee: The University of the South
Surrounded by protected forest, residents of Ambodivohitra and land managers at the World Wildlife Foundation reveal how commodity crops and wood use affect on-the-ground conservation practices in the rainforests of northeast Madagascar.

In January, Berkeley, Calif., passed a 25-cent tax on disposable cups. (Miriam Gordon)

George Washington University
Recycling is not the answer — not anymore. Here's how a circular economy can both reduce waste and lessen the climate crisis — and why we need to change our mindset now.

Pages