Green Living

A lot of simple, seemingly insignificant things can add up to a positive and meaningful global change. PF Members have solutions to living a more sustainable day to day life.

New York restaurant, Blue Hill, was one of the first to prioritize ultra-local sourcing. (Lou Stejskal)

The George Washington University
To lower their environmental impact, restaurants are transitioning their operations to be more sustainable and climate friendly.

(Paulina Oswald/Eckerd College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Here are seven ways to get started on reducing your environmental impact that are easy on you and your wallet.
Makeup display at the Take Care shop in Georgetown

A makeup display featuring all ethically sourced and produced items at Georgetown store, Take Care. (Margo H. Kaplan/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
To me, progress looks a lot like the contents of my makeup bag. And no, I don’t say that because I’ve finally mastered the perfect smokey eye.
Secondhand shop

Shopping secondhand — in person or online — is good for both the economy and for the environment. (Pixabay)

George Washington University
While retail is struggling because of the COVID-19 pandemic, secondhand shopping is booming. This is an unexpected win for sustainability.
George Washington University
100 community scientists flood Houston streets to track where it's the hottest in hopes to inform climate mitigation plans.

(Photo courtesy of Forbi Perise)

The George Washington University
Plastic pollution is an issue prevalent all throughout Cameroon. One man saw the problem as a challenge to help. Now, he's recycling and upcycling plastic bottles — and inspiring a movement.
San Deigo Bus coming into a stop.

(Image by Maggie Scholle)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of San Diego
The cornerstone of the 2021 regional plan is the “5 Big Moves”: Five overarching strategies to change the way San Diegans use transit — but these are contingent on a willingness to change the way they commute.

Raw, boiled, fermented, alive, fluorescent, it's all edible, mostly. (Illustration by Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
An exploration of the untapped value of cephalopods and algae in a sustainable seafood diet.
Photo by Alexandr Podvalny

(Alexandr Podvalny/Unsplash)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Organizations in Madison, Wisconsin, focus on community-based solutions to improving food access during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Customers walk through the Dupont FRESHFARM Market in Washington, D.C., which has been open throughout the pandemic under public health restrictions. (Lizzie Stricklin/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Deemed essential services, D.C. farmers markets have remained open since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic – but in order to keep vendors, staff and customers safe, markets have had to make sudden changes.

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