Green Living

A lot of simple, seemingly insignificant things can add up to a positive and meaningful global change. PF Members have solutions to living a more sustainable day to day life.

plant grows by a marsh

A plant grows by a marsh at the Willow Waterhole Greenway Project. (Luz Rivera/FLICKR)

Northwestern University
Hybrid, nature-based infrastructure could help protect areas like Houston, Texas from floods, while providing other benefits for the community.

Students in Oxford, UK protesting against climate change injustice at as part of a nationwide youth climate strike (Evan Barnard/University of Georgia)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Georgia
While studying abroad at the University of Oxford in Oxford, England, I witnessed what can happen when young people get together for a public demonstration of environmental mentality.

(Handout)

Northwestern University
The Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games has been collecting used electronics all over Japan to extract the metal and make Olympic medals.

A view of downtown Seattle from Kerry Park. (Diana Robinson/Creative Commons)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
"Urban resilience” is a hot term being thrown around within the environmental community. But what does it mean?
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Learn about technology that helps wastewater treatment plants create valuable fertilizers from the nutrients in their wastewater.
George Washington University
Mundo Verde, a bilingual elementary school in NW D.C., prides itself on being a "green" school. One way they encourage this is to provide children with sustainable meals.

Judy Hogan, 81, is an environmental activist and author. (Photos by Emma Tobin/UNC-Chapel Hill)

UNC Chapel Hill
Judy Hogan is an 81-year-old environmental activist and writer who has been fighting issues of environmental justice in Chatham County, N.C. for decades, and is now taking on coal ash dumping with little community support.

Many of this mall's tenants left after the anchors stores closed at The Mall at the Source in Westbury, New York. (Creative Commons)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
The decline of shopping malls is a result of online shopping and the need for instant gratification.
Eckerd College
The Eckerd College Reduce Single-Use project has developed a guide for colleges and universities looking to break free from single-use plastic.
The George Washington University
The plastic industry boomed after World War II. But it didn’t take long for reality to sink in. Plastics were polluters. So now what?

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