Green Living

A lot of simple, seemingly insignificant things can add up to a positive and meaningful global change. PF Members have solutions to living a more sustainable day to day life.

Dan Yates, CEO, discusses what makes Opower special, why Opower is an innovator, why the US is a good place to start a business, and how Opower contributes to improving the state of the world.
Submitted for the 2010 GreenGov Presidential Awards by Bonneville Power Administration.
Planet Forward
The Seattle City Council voted 8-1 Monday to create a registry for residents who no longer wish to receive the yellow pages phone books. Though current opt-out systems exist from distributors, Seattle has become the first city in the United States... Read More
Most Americans think of water in terms of what they drink or use every day. They rarely consider the enormous amounts of water needed to produce energy that powers their lives. Energy and water are intrinsically connected: Without one, we cannot... Read More
As a consultant focused on maintenance, renovation and life-extension of non-residential building roofs, I found this article (http://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2010/10/07/leed-and-future-green-building) makes some great points regarding the evolution of... Read More
When it comes to science, the National Science Foundation knows what they’re talking about. Check out what they’re doing to increase recycling at their headquarters--you might be able to apply some of their ideas to your home or business!
The George Washington University
by M. Ravichandran Check out this entrepreneurial Georgetown undergrad who started a non-profit company that consults for DC area residents and businesses looking to install solar panels! He's smart, savvy and GREEN, ladies ;)
In April 2009, The Cen-Tex Sustainability Communities Partnership was created when Fort Hood signed a memorandum of understanding with the surrounding cities of Killeen, Copperas Cove, Gatesville, and Harker Heights to plan and implement goals that... Read More
Rehabilitation of 1906 brick warehouse by the U.S. General Services Administration. This is Utah's first LEED-certified building to quality for federal historic preservation tax credits.

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