Green Living

A green sign reads "Ruelle verte" or green alley over a wooden pagado.

The sign on the wooden arch reads "Ruelle verte" or "green alley" (Clarice Knelly/SUNY-Plattsburgh).

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
William Borque said the alleyways that surrounded Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie's community garden in Montreal used to be a “wasteland.” Now, they’re brimming with fruit trees, mushroom gardens and local art.
Two individuals perched contemplatively on a rocky pier.

Hammonasset Beach State Park, Madison, Connecticut (2021) (Zoey England/University of Connecticut).

University of Connecticut
Although ecoanxiety impacts all ages, its influences are disproportionately felt among young people. These feelings, compounded in many by COP26’s resolution, make prioritizing mental well-being as a climate activist paramount.
Several neutral toned skyscrapers sit under a blue sky on the edge of a body of water.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York, New York (massmatt/Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/). 

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | I’ll probably never know if climate change caused all that extra pollen that sent me to the emergency room that day, but the science is definitive. Warming temperatures usher in way more pollen.
A prototype wooden model of the architect's triangular structure, and features scaled down human figures, and boats. The sides of the building are open to allow the viewer to peer inside.

Nigerian-born architect Kunlé Adeyemi's NLÉ studio developed the Makoko Floating School as a prototype for building in areas prone to flooding. The triangular shape gives the structure stability on the water, with a low center of gravity. (B/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

George Washington University
On the second to last day of COP26, the official theme of the day is cities, regions, and built environments. But what is a built environment, and why is the link to climate change so important?
Muddy brown waters fill what is presumably streets and lower levels of a parking garage, which stands behind a bank of trees. Two mid-height office buildings are in the background

Flooding took over the northeast after Tropical Storm Ida in early September 2021. These floodwaters are in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia's neighbor to the northwest. (Michael M Stokes/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Philadelphia's sewage system and water infrastructure are being stressed by climate change and it's leading to a rather gross — and dangerous — situation.
Tractor in a lush field at sunset
Northwestern University
According to The Nature Conservancy, intense weather will transform hydrology, health, economics, and ecosystems in Illinois, as reported by Eva Herscowitz for Medill.
George Washington University
Marine scientists are using information collected by everyday people to monitor sharks in the face of climate change.

2021 Planet Forward Summit host Frank Sesno in conversation with NBC’s Today Show weatherman Al Roker.

George Washington University
Here are five methods to make climate change more relevant to your audience from the guest speakers at the 2021 Planet Forward Summit.
George Washington University
In this short film, Planet Forward Comcast Sustainable Storytelling Fellow Francesca Edralin explores how classroom gardening can be used as a tool to address food insecurity.
University of California, Berkeley
"Color The Water" centers on a recently graduated University of Southern California student who is part of the organization, Color The Water, a nonprofit that gives people of color free surfing lessons as a means of healing.

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