Green Communities

It takes a village. Or a city. Some PF Member ideas for turning whole communities green.

One of the bottle refilling stations on campus. (Alexander Welling/The Hatchet)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | George Washington University
A task force aiming to eliminate the use of single-use plastics on campus produced a report in October 2020 recommending plans like cutting plastic bottles from vending machines and installing more water bottle fillers in residence halls.

The Green Bronx Machine teaches students how to garden and produce their own nutritious food. (Photo courtesy of Green Bronx Machine)

The George Washington University
The Bronx is home to many things — Yankee Stadium, the Bronx Zoo, the birth of hip-hop — and most recently, an idea powerful enough to change the world.
A residential street at night, illuminated by a row of streetlights.

A residential street at night, illuminated by a row of streetlights. (Matthew Brown/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY-ESF
We keep putting so much light into the world that we are losing the dark.
SUNY ESF
The value of public space can not be understated — and it is even considered a key issue of environmental justice — as open public spaces increase the quality of life for all people living in an area. 

Murals, graffiti, posters and sculptures make a city come alive. They become attractions, a mark of home. (Photos by Tabitha Wechter/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
The photos included in this essay serve as a tour through the city of Syracuse, NY, and use street art as a tool to measure community status and gentrification.
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | The George Washington University
The invention of plastic has transformed human life. Plastics are incredibly convenient, and far more affordable than alternative materials. However, the downsides are overwhelming.
An image of a cherry orchard filled with white blossoms.

The cherry orchard the author grew up on in Niagara County, N.Y. (Caleb Seib/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Intentionally developing place connections will allow us to create environmental actions that are community-driven.

New York restaurant, Blue Hill, was one of the first to prioritize ultra-local sourcing. (Lou Stejskal)

The George Washington University
To lower their environmental impact, restaurants are transitioning their operations to be more sustainable and climate friendly.
George Washington University
A seminar in Stockholm, which aims to be fossil fuel free by 2040, had this student examining the culture and lifestyle that has a much smaller emissions footprint per capita than we do in the United States.

Hundreds of Tucson residents are using green spaces during the pandemic like the Loop, a 131-mile paved bikeway that now sees hundreds of daily users. (Jake Meyers / University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Green spaces not only help cities mitigate and adapt to climate change; they can help residents cope with the shock of COVID-19.

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