Food

Eat better, smarter. Grow cleaner, more sustainable food. Great bumper stickers, but how do you do it? PF members offer their solutions on how use science and good practice to feed ourselves more sustainably.

Grafitti Earth dining

Jehangir Mehta proves sustainable dining can be chic in the heart of Manhattan by pioneering zero waste restaurant practices and sustainable sourcing. (Photos courtesy of Graffiti Earth)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Jehangir Mehta proves sustainable dining can be chic in the heart of Manhattan by pioneering zero waste restaurant practices and sustainable sourcing. 
Farmers market donation jar

A donation jar placed on a book table at the weekly Oxford Community Farmers Market.

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Mississippi
One farmers market in Oxford, Mississippi, has re-established themselves as a community center in an effort to battle food insecurity. 
Sustainability labels

Could produce and packaged food be labeled with carbon data in the future? (Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
The food system emits up to one-third of global greenhouse gas emissions and many consumers are looking for ways to reduce their carbon footprint. Sustainability labeling may be part of the solution.

Farmer Roric Paulman talks with students about the challenges facing the aquifer, about 90 feet beneath their feet. (Planet Forward staff)

University of Missouri
In the face of a changing climate, the agriculture industry is increasingly figuring out how to produce more and use less.
McPheeters family
George Washington University
The popular imagination may think of agriculture as Mom and Dad with a pitchfork, but today’s Nebraskan corn farm is probably the furthest thing from the average arm-chair-futurist’s daydreams of farming reality.
George Washington University
On a Planet Forward storytelling trip this fall to Nebraska, I was inspired by the women we met — women not all in roles you'd expect to find on family farms and in the agriculture industry. 
The McPheeters Farm

A hilltop on the McPheeters farm in Gothenburg, Nebraska, offers a great vantage point to survey the family's land. (Planet Forward staff)

Arizona State University
“I know that we (farmers) are an integral part of the ecosystem of the Earth,” Nebraska farmer Scott McPheeters said. “We need to make it sustainable for everybody. We have to do it well and do it right.”
McPheeters Farm

The McPheeters family primarily farms corn, which is sold to Frito-Lay and used to make ethanol. (Laura Whaling/GWU)

Planet Forward Podcast
On this podcast, follow me on my journey to southwestern Nebraska to the McPheeters family farm to learn about their relationship with their land.
NET Nebraska group picture

Our first stop in Nebraska is in Lincoln: NET Nebraska, the headquarters for the state's network of public radio and television stations. Here the group met with experienced storytellers to learn more about environmental challenges that have been covered and the people the reporters met. From left: Dan Reed, Chad Davis, Eleanor Hasenbeck, Ilana Creinin, Laura Waxman, Topanga McBride, Diana Marcum, Laura Whaling, Will Lennon, Sydney Greene, Zack Smith and Kim Ossi.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
In mid-September, nine students from universities across the country met in one of America's agricultural epicenters: Nebraska. We were here to tell some of the environmental stories found in our country's heartland.
Carbon footprint of meals

A protein dense, carbon friendly lunch. (Photo by Katherine Baker)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
A comparison between 5 meals shows that carbon emissions per calorie varies greatly for certain types of food. Not surprisingly, meat recipes hold the highest carbon-to-calorie ratio.

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