Food

Eat better, smarter. Grow cleaner, more sustainable food. Great bumper stickers, but how do you do it? PF members offer their solutions on how use science and good practice to feed ourselves more sustainably.

(Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Tackling Food Waste series: Any food discussion inevitably involves GMOs. Columbia University's Katherine Baker spoke with an organic farmer and plant pathologist/geneticist to find out more.
Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Next in our series: Photojournalist James Wooldridge takes a peek into the diversity of form among California's farms, which points out the intersection between art and science in agriculture.

Planet Forward students toured Bayer's research gardens as a part of our trip. But we happened to visit when the facility was open to everyone through an annual event called "Field Days," where they focus on communicating about agriculture to both educate and demystify the process. (Planet Forward)

Kansas State University
Sustainability and food used to be separate conversations. In the next story in the series, Kansas State's Olivia Bergmeier explores how sustainable ag is now a joint conversation — and both consumers and producers are talking together.

In mid-August, the sunflowers are nearly ready for harvest at Schreiner Farms in Woodland, Calif. (Dani Huffman/Kenyon College)

Kenyon College
Next in our Tackling Food Waste series: Kenyon College student farmer Dani Huffman looks at the pros and cons of traditional and organic farming - and the issue of sustainable agriculture. Turns out it isn't as black and white as it seems.

A tractor sits idle on Eric Schreiner's family farm. Schreiner Farms grows tomatoes for The Morning Star Company, which produces products for companies like Campbell's and Heinz. (Brigit Kenney/Eckerd College)

Eckerd College
In the next story in our Tackling Food Waste series, Eckerd College student Brigit Kenney looks at the broad connection between food production to actually getting that food on our plates. It's a much larger process than she expected to see.
Farmer in a tractor
Texas Tech University
Taking a look into making sustainable agriculture practices in California's Central Valley, it's obvious that farmers and seed suppliers have their work cut out for them.
Overflowing dumpsters

Here's an unpopular, but environmentally friendly habit that can prevent food waste and reduce the amount of waste that heads to the landfill: Dumpster diving. And, surprise! You might also make some money doing it. (Photos by Peter Jurich/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
My partner and I have been dumpster diving for a little over a year now. It sounds gross — and it certainly can be — but we've found mostly benefits to this uncommon practice.

(Ben_Kerckx/Pixabay)

Planet Forward Correspondent | GW Law School
People choose not to compost for a variety of reasons, however we have tried to rebut all the major arguments against composting to show you how easy and impactful composting is.
Razorback sucker fish held by a biologist

Razorback suckers are endemic to the Colorado River Basin and have been listed as endangered since 1991. Thanks to an intensive breeding and stocking program, numbers of the fish have increased in parts of the river and its tributaries. (Photo by Luke Runyon/KUNC)

Arizona State University
Fish in the Colorado River are a product of harsh conditions. But human interference in the rivers they call home has pushed a few to the edge of extinction. Luke Runyon of KUNC reports.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
As the nation finds itself recovering from yet another record-setting and devastating hurricane, NET’s “On the Table” looks at how farmers and ranchers receive federal disaster relief.

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