Food

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of San Diego
Correspondent Maggie Scholle observes a grunion run, a seasonal phenomenon of fish spawning that lines the Southern California coast.

New materials are added to a compost pile at Lederer Gardens in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 15, 2020. (Photos by Arielle Bader/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Despite our obsession with food, we throw so much of it away. Learn more about composting, a change you can make at home to help the earth.
SUNY-ESF
In the media and pop-culture, fishing is depicted as a recreational opportunity for relaxation, excitement, and meditation. How does this compare to those who must fish in visibly dirty waters for their next meal?
The George Washington University
Environmentalists and scientists have always asked, how can we save our oceans? One solution, aquaculture, instead asks us to look at ways in which the world's oceans can save themselves.

New York restaurant, Blue Hill, was one of the first to prioritize ultra-local sourcing. (Lou Stejskal)

The George Washington University
To lower their environmental impact, restaurants are transitioning their operations to be more sustainable and climate friendly.

(Rosie De La Cruz/Unsplash)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
The farmers market is, if anything, a quintessential unifier for communities. But this year, for many, it looked different.
Founding Director, Planet Forward
Imagine wearing a T-shirt made out of ... spoiled milk. Find out more in our latest episode of Planet Forward, seen on PBS's Peril and Promise and produced in association with ASU's Global Futures Laboratory.
George Washington University
Alicia Powers, the managing director of the ​Hunger Solutions Institute​ at Auburn University, shares how groups are addressing the ​effects​ of the COVID-19 pandemic on food insecurity, and how sustainability can be prioritized too.

When Carol Anne Sayle began farming with her husband Larry Butler in 1981, they were ahead of their time as urban farmers. They also became early voices in the locavore movement in Austin, Texas. (Eva Legge/Dartmouth College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Dartmouth College
Two Austin, Texas, urban farms led the way for their area's locavore movement. These farmers talk about their motivation, and discuss why eating local is so important.

Raw, boiled, fermented, alive, fluorescent, it's all edible, mostly. (Illustration by Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

The George Washington University
An exploration of the untapped value of cephalopods and algae in a sustainable seafood diet.

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