Food

Eat better, smarter. Grow cleaner, more sustainable food. Great bumper stickers, but how do you do it? PF members offer their solutions on how use science and good practice to feed ourselves more sustainably.

NET Nebraska group picture

Our first stop in Nebraska is in Lincoln: NET Nebraska, the headquarters for the state's network of public radio and television stations. Here the group met with experienced storytellers to learn more about environmental challenges that have been covered and the people the reporters met. From left: Dan Reed, Chad Davis, Eleanor Hasenbeck, Ilana Creinin, Laura Waxman, Topanga McBride, Diana Marcum, Laura Whaling, Will Lennon, Sydney Greene, Zack Smith and Kim Ossi.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
In mid-September, nine students from universities across the country met in one of America's agricultural epicenters: Nebraska. We were here to tell some of the environmental stories found in our country's heartland.
Carbon footprint of meals

A protein dense, carbon friendly lunch. (Photo by Katherine Baker)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
A comparison between 5 meals shows that carbon emissions per calorie varies greatly for certain types of food. Not surprisingly, meat recipes hold the highest carbon-to-calorie ratio.
Foraging

Foraging helps create a better relationship between people and food. (Max Pixel)

Syracuse University
Developing a healthier connection to the natural world might be as simple as trying out some new cuisine. Expert forager Sam Thayer shares his thoughts on how foraging can help us see ecosystems as sacred places we need to care for. 
Northwestern University
Every August, hundreds of fishermen, boaters and spectators descend on the tiny village of Bath, Illinois for a weekend of fun — and to try to catch the most invasive Asian carp.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi live in symbiosis with plant roots and are able to store up to 70 percent of organic carbon from leaf litter. (Mark Perkins/Flickr)

George Washington University
In many cases microbes are already helping the planet in underrated ways. Technological developments and advanced genetic engineering make microbiological innovation a major player in climate change mitigation.
Tilling soil

Tilling loosens soil to enable roots to sprout more easily, however it also exposes pockets of 'uneaten' carbon to hungry microbes. (Allan Murray-Rust/Wikimedia)

Northwestern - Medill
From breaking down escaping methane from melting ice caps to storing carbon in non-tilled soils, microbes are already mitigating climate change. 
Supporting local agriculture - a farmer transplants rice

A farmer works to transplant rice. (International Rice Research Institute)

Eco-Business
A pioneering, crowdfunding platform is bringing individual investors and farmers together for a shared stake in Philippines' agriculture.

Tanzania. (Hailey Smalley/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Anthropogenic climate change is currently influencing rainfall and temperature patterns in East Africa. Here's everything you need to know about how East Africans are confronting these challenges.

A historical photograph of the West Calumet Housing Complex provided by the East Chicago Public Library for the Northwest Indiana Times.

Northwestern University
High lead and arsenic contamination has been plaguing East Chicago, Indiana, residential areas since at least the 1980s. Read about residents who have been affected by this crisis and their fight for recovery.
Bees maintain harmony between elephants and farmers.

Crop-raiding by migrating African elephants is a pressing issue for many farmers who border protected land. Bees provide an simple, ecologically friendly way to maintain harmony between elephant migrations and the farmers' livelihoods. (Hailey Smalley/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Farmers in East Africa are using bees to deter crop raiding elephants and increase food security in the area.

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