Colleges & Education

Innovation doesn't just happen in a beaker, some teachers are creating new ways to inspire students to learn more about climate change, and changing their own campuses in the process.

Poster advertising the 1972 Black Community Survival Conference, with a promotion by the Free Food Program. (Photo: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, 1972)

Bates College
We should remember the critical work the Black Panther Party did in their communities to help right injustices, and help prevent hunger among children and communities as a whole.
George Washington University
For many years U.S. water regulation was an issue with bipartisan support. So what changed? And how are those changes affecting our water and wetlands? 

An event held at the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm, for which Hazon is a supporting partner. (Lottie Spady/Hazon)

SUNY Plattsburgh
Hazon is a Jewish organization that is leading and educating the Jewish community on issues of sustainability and the environment.
On site research collection with MaRTy cart

Project advisor Jennifer Vanos, left, and William Walker, discuss the data we collected at Paideia Academies using the MaRTy cart, which helps us gauge the human thermal experience while walking. (Adora Shortridge/Arizona State University)

Arizona State University
Extreme heat is particularly dangerous to children. But with no clear school heat policies and facing a lack of resources, how will schools keep kids safe as temperatures continue to rise?
Northwestern University
Emily Little and Marisa Sloan report on the work Fermilab is doing, exploring quantum computing as a means of sustainability research.
SUNY-Plattsburgh
As the world continues to urbanize, there is increasingly becoming a higher need for green, sustainable architecture. One striking example of this is Parc Frederic-Back in Montreal.

When the Cameron Peak Fire raged over the summer, it was obvious that the air quality was not safe in Northern Colorado. But air quality concerns aren't always as visually noticeable. (Photo by Jennifer Clary)

Colorado State University
How can we know if it’s safe to breathe the air that surrounds us?
An image of a cherry orchard filled with white blossoms.

The cherry orchard the author grew up on in Niagara County, N.Y. (Caleb Seib/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Intentionally developing place connections will allow us to create environmental actions that are community-driven.
SUNY-ESF
Learn about biodiversity through the short story of a tree that is witnessing the impact of humans on its environment—from canopy loss to animal migration.
George Washington University
How does being a college athlete make my environmental footprint larger? And what can I — and my school — do about it?

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