Climate

(Laura Whaling/Planet Forward)

UC Berkeley
Part of our Stories of Alaska series, this piece explores the state through wildlife, plants and bioindicators, looking at today's challenges and accomplishments, and signs of what's to come. 
Planet Forward Correspondent | Sewanee: The University of the South
Story four in our Stories of Alaska series focuses on the timber industry — one part of the resource-rich puzzle that is Alaska — and the yearslong debate over the "Roadless Area Conservation" rule.
Whale breaching

“Killer whales are apex predators, the dominant animals in these waters," explains Christine West, a naturalist aboard the National Geographic Sea Lion. This means their health reflects that of the entire habitat, as pollutants at every trophic level will travel up the food web and into these organisms. By the time these impacts are visible, however, it may be too late for a simple, one-size-fits-all solution. (Mike Harris/Lindblad Expeditions)

UC Berkeley
In story three of our Stories of Alaska series, we hear from a Lindblad Expeditions naturalist, who talks about living and working in a place where people see the consequences of their actions in real time.
San Francisco sunset

San Francisco at sunset. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
What will the world look like if science gets lost in the reds and blues when it is most needed? As politics and science stray from each other, scientists must inject themselves into the political conversation to save our planet.
Northwestern University
Alaskan Native Americans face problems with reduced number of salmon due to climate change.
air pollution

(Pixabay)

Northwestern University
The University of Michigan is investing millions to create technologies that capture carbon dioxide and turn it into products, though experts say some may not help reduce greenhouse gas permanently. Roxanne Liu and Minghe Hu report.
Navajo Generating Station

The Navajo Generating Station, a coal fired power-plant near Page, Arizona. (Myrabella/Wikimedia Commons)

State University College at Buffalo
Climate scientists from around the globe have laid out the maximum amount of CO2 that can be emitted into the atmosphere while still maintaining the 2°C increase in temperature. This threshold is called the carbon budget. But what exactly is it?

(Photo courtesy Andreas Carlgren)

Loyola University Chicago
Sweden's former Minister of the Environment, Andreas Carlgren, instructs students at The Newman Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, and in this Q&A, provides unique insight into the environmental consciousness that pervades the country.

An aerial view of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Milton, Delaware. Wetlands, like those shown here, has many benefits for a bay's ecosystem, including filtering runoff, mitigating floods, and as a home to baby fish and invertebrates. (Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

University of Delaware
The health of the Delaware Bay is in question. Human activities, even those at the far reaches of a watershed, can deeply effect a bay's ecosystem. So how can we prevent more damage and work on restoration?
Tara McLaughlin, president of Kalu Yala Institute

Tara McLaughlin, president of Kalu Yala Institute, speaks about her background doing volunteer work abroad and current efforts of Kalu Yala to increase integration with San Miguel. (Abigail Foerstner/Medill)

Northwestern University
Real estate entrepreneur Jimmy Stice hopes to build small, sustainable houses in Kalu Yala, the jungle retreat, eco-town, and host to an institute for college interns he founded in the Panamanian rainforest. Medill's Leah Dunlevy reports.

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