Climate Change

Climate change affects all of us and all the systems on planet Earth - from natural disasters to disrupted growing seasons, our changing climate is having widespread effects. Here are some ideas for how to deal with climate change, how to adapt and how to try and cut down on the change while we still can.

local transportation is via boat

Traveling on boats is the main mode of transportation between islands of Guna Yala, and most are operated by local Guna people. (Luodan Rojas/Medill)

Northwestern University
Separated by miles of ocean and a 2-hour drive, or a 50-mile hike, through the jungle, Guna Yala and Kalu Yala are two of Panama’s most sustainable communities, but they also are starkly different. Medill's Luodan Rojas reports.
Sights and Sounds of Guna Yala – March 2018 by Colin Boyle
Sights and Sounds of Guna Yala – March 2018 by Colin Boyle
Northwestern University
Speckled just north of the vivacious Panamanian coastline is a chain of islands facing the threat of disappearing. The islands' daunting fate is not determined by the doing of their inhabitants, but rather by the world around them.
Guna in San Blas Islands

Diwigdi Valiente says that many older Guna people don’t understand climate change, especially since they have lived traditional lives that contribute very little to the problem. (Alex Schwartz/Medill)

Northwestern University
Medill's Jessica Mordacq reports from Panama: The San Blas Islands and Kalu Yala are two very different environments in Panama that both revolve heavily around tourism.
Aresio Valiente López and Diwigdi Valiente

The father and son pair, Aresio Valiente López and Diwigdi Valiente, pose for a portrait in the university where López teaches, la Universidad de Panamá. The two share a dynamic bond, a call and response relationship of bouncing ideas off of each other, always out of a sense of mutual pride. (Colin Boyle/Medill)

Northwestern University
Medill's Laura Zornosa reports from Panama: Sustainability means preserving the culture of San Blas’ sinking islands for this environmental advocate.
Climate change kids

Jacob Lebel, in the tan jacket center left, and fellow plaintiffs in front of the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. (Robin Loznak)

George Washington University
A group of 21 young plaintiffs have sued the federal government for climate change. We interviewed one of the plaintiffs involved for a run-down on the history, implications, and new advancements in the lawsuit. 
Lonely Lake
University of Wisconsin-Madison
The global warming is real. When you go to school near a lake that freezes during winter, the lake is your everyday's weather forecast and the best evidence of climate change.
SUNY ESF
An interview with Sayje Lasenberry, an ESF student pioneering industrial hemp to be used as a sustainable construction material.
George Washington University
"The 92 Percent" aims to raise awareness about the consequences of climate change on children's health, highlight the important work pediatricians and parents are doing in this space, and inspire action to create a healthier world for future... Read More

The Ganges river delta is the main source of drinking water for hundreds of millions of people. While satellites say the delta has had a net-loss of water storage over the course of most of the 21st century, climate models used to predict water scarcity into the future often say the region gained water. (Image courtesy of NASA)

Northwestern - Medill
New study lays groundwork for improving how we predict water scarcity into the future.
University of South Florida
We have a population that is on the rise. Our home of 7 billion needs to learn to make adjustments in order to ensure each and every inhabitant can live a peaceful life.

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