Climate Change

Climate change affects all of us and all the systems on planet Earth - from natural disasters to disrupted growing seasons, our changing climate is having widespread effects. Here are some ideas for how to deal with climate change, how to adapt and how to try and cut down on the change while we still can.

Alaska sunset

A sunset photo from on board the National Geographic Sea Lion, during my recent life-changing trip to Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: While many still find climate change up for debate, perhaps the way to engage and persuade these individuals is by focusing on its effects in their own communities rather than in far away places.
Inian Institute

The Inian Islands Institute, dubbed the “hobbit hole” by its residents, sits in a remote area near where the Inside Passage meets the Gulf of Alaska. This patch of land has been a hotbed of human activities for centuries; from Tlingit summer fishing camp to fox farm homestead. Now in the hands of scientists the land is used as an ecological research field camp. (Photos by Shandra Furtado/George Washington University)

George Washington University
In this photo essay, part of our Stories of Alaska series, learn about a climate and nature research center hidden among the temperate forests speckled along Alaska's southeastern coast: the Inian Islands Institute.
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Stories of Alaska series: Learn about how climate change and overfishing are threatening marine species. But Alaska sets a prime example of how to maintain a sustainable fish supply.
Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park

Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park in southern Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: Climate change isn’t just seen – it’s felt. Weather and temperature fluctuations aside, many experience health impacts caused or exacerbated by climate change.

(Laura Whaling/Planet Forward)

UC Berkeley
Part of our Stories of Alaska series, this piece explores the state through wildlife, plants and bioindicators, looking at today's challenges and accomplishments, and signs of what's to come. 
San Francisco sunset

San Francisco at sunset. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
What will the world look like if science gets lost in the reds and blues when it is most needed? As politics and science stray from each other, scientists must inject themselves into the political conversation to save our planet.
Northwestern University
Alaskan Native Americans face problems with reduced number of salmon due to climate change.
Navajo Generating Station

The Navajo Generating Station, a coal fired power-plant near Page, Arizona. (Myrabella/Wikimedia Commons)

State University College at Buffalo
Climate scientists from around the globe have laid out the maximum amount of CO2 that can be emitted into the atmosphere while still maintaining the 2°C increase in temperature. This threshold is called the carbon budget. But what exactly is it?

(Photo courtesy Andreas Carlgren)

Loyola University Chicago
Sweden's former Minister of the Environment, Andreas Carlgren, instructs students at The Newman Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, and in this Q&A, provides unique insight into the environmental consciousness that pervades the country.

An aerial view of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Milton, Delaware. Wetlands, like those shown here, has many benefits for a bay's ecosystem, including filtering runoff, mitigating floods, and as a home to baby fish and invertebrates. (Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

University of Delaware
The health of the Delaware Bay is in question. Human activities, even those at the far reaches of a watershed, can deeply effect a bay's ecosystem. So how can we prevent more damage and work on restoration?

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