Climate Change

Climate change affects all of us and all the systems on planet Earth - from natural disasters to disrupted growing seasons, our changing climate is having widespread effects. Here are some ideas for how to deal with climate change, how to adapt and how to try and cut down on the change while we still can.

Air pollution smoke rising from a plant tower

Smoke rises from a plant tower, polluting the air. (Public Domain)

State University College at Buffalo
Susan Anenberg, an expert in public health and environmental studies, sat down with Planet Forward to discuss the implications that unchecked pollution can have on human life.
Paris Climate Protesters

"Locally and globally, only the action of the people saves the climate," the sign says. Demonstrators at the Paris Climate Accord urge people to ignore political standstill and take action, which is exactly what U.S. corporations have been doing in the wake of Trump's withdrawal from the agreement. (Flickr)

State University College at Buffalo
In the wake of Trump pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord, states and local governments are pulling together to combat climate change.
13.6 million Olympic-sized swimming pools
State University College at Buffalo
By comparing Harvey to other natural disasters, we can see that this unfortunately ordinary occurrence has become extraordinary.
MPH@GW, The George Washington University
The most dangerous jobs in the United States may become even more dangerous thanks to climate change.

In April 2016, Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Climate Agreement, while holding his 2-year-old granddaughter. At COP21 in December 2015, Kerry said, "The world has come together around an agreement that will empower us to chart a new path for our planet – a smart and responsible path, a sustainable path. And extraordinarily, we are 196 delegations, 186 plans. That is a remarkable global commitment." (U.S. State Department)

Planet Forward
The Planet Forward Advisory Board member explains his unconventional opinion about how he felt toward the withdrawal from the Paris agreement.
Political third-party logos

A sampling of political third party logos: Green Party (top left), Constitution Party (center left), Patriot Party (center right), Pirate Party (top right), Socialist Party (bottom left), Libertarian Party (center left), New Whig Party (center right), and Justice Party (bottom right). (Democracy Chronicles/Creative Commons)

Planet Forward Intern, Towson University
The 2016 Presidential Election had more than 6.9 million Americans voting for a third party. As registered independents increase, what do these third parties look like, and what are their views on the environment? 

A poster for Caleb Q. Dyer for State Representative. (Photo courtesy Caleb Q. Dyer)

Planet Forward Intern, Towson University
New Hampshire State Rep. Caleb Dyer is a 21-year-old libertarian in a state which the economy is reliant on carbon eminent forms of energy.

In this image from 2012, Brian Lawson and Kenesaw Burwell work on panels that the Energy Department is using to leverage a Power Purchase Agreement with Sun Edison and Xcel Energy. (Dennis Schroeder/U.S. Department of Energy)

Planet Forward Intern, Elon University
Although our president’s withdrawal from the Paris Accord is a frustrating setback to environmental advocates, it does not come as a surprise.

A scene from the People's Climate March in 2014 in New York City. (South Bend Voice/Creative Commons)

Planet Forward Intern, Towson University
The United States leaving the Paris Accord seemed like an end of the world decision for many, but I see it as a new day and a chance for greater innovation.
Planet Forward
This is the first in our series of Expert Voices sharing their thoughts on how we move the planet forward following the United States' withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord.

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