Climate

Labor activists join environmentalists wearing turtle costumes at the 1999 WTO protests in Seattle, Washington.

Labor activists join environmentalists wearing turtle costumes at the 1999 WTO protests in Seattle, Washington. (Courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives, Item 175623)

Georgetown University
I interview labor and environmental activist Joe Uehlein about the historic intersections between those two activist movements and how he tells those stories in his music.
A small white boat rests buoyed on clear, blue-green waters under a cloudy blue sky with a gentle mountain in the distance.

The shores of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritus, as seen from Île aux Aigrettes, one of the most prominent reserves in the Indian Ocean, on July 21, 2022. Almost two years prior, this water was blackened by an oil spill from the MV Wakashio. (Zoey England/University of Connecticut)

University of Connecticut
This July marks two years since the MV Wakashio oil spill. Though environmental NGOs have left the island and news coverage of the disaster has ceased, youth around Mauritius are still reeling from the effects of the tragedy.
A grey, rocky peak juts up from the center of the frame and overlooks trees and a view all the way to a foggy-looking horizon.

View from Hawk Mountain (Rachel Freed/George Washington University)

George Washington University
As climate change worsens and people migrate, seeking safety in higher elevations, Appalachia is expected to become a prime destination for thousands of Americans. How can this new community create a sustainable future?
A woman in a white shirt is surrounded by wildlife rangers wearing green jumpsuits. The group holds a large white picture frame with text that reads, "I conquered the Wildlife Ranger Challenge. #ForWildlifeRangers," and five logos of supporting organizations fill the bottom of the frame.

Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo, in white, poses for a photograph at the Wildlife Ranger Challenge, a project to both raise funds and awareness of the struggles facing wildlife rangers across Africa. (Photo courtesy Taku Mutezo)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo has a solution to Zimbabwe's human-wildlife conflict that uses natural and local resources, and benefits the community as well.
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
In this sequel to “Coastal Degradation Through Fresh Eyes,” Amka and Suka meet a new friend who introduces them to the issue of melting glaciers and revitalizes them to get back on track with their environmental mission.
A crowd of protestors march toward a body of water. A protest sign reads "Evict Enbridge."

At the Heart of the Turtle Gathering, protestors called for the shutdown of Enbridge Line 5 and cancellation of the proposed tunnel project. (Samantha Anderer/Medill)

Northwestern University
Land management debates puncture the broader political context of energy, oil and climate change, Samantha Anderer reports. In northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula, controversy surrounds the Enbridge Line 5 oil pipeline.
Two people stand by the shoreline of a beach, one carrying a clipboard, the other looking down the beach with a monocular.

SCCF shorebird biologist Audrey Albrecht (left) and shorebird intern Elsa Wilson (right) survey shorebirds near Bowman’s Beach. (Sarah Anderson/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
"By participating in shorebird, wading bird and colonial nesting bird surveys, I learned that birds face many more threats than they pose," Sarah Anderson writes.
A bright blue sky stands behind towering mountains carved deep in the center by ancient glaciers. On the right a bright orange life jacket and camera lens are visible of a photographer capturing the scene aboard a small boat. Blue-green water is immediately in the foreground.

Ancient glaciers carved this canyon in Tracy Arm Fjord thousands of years ago. Our group sailed via Zodiac to the glacier’s face. (Halley Hughes/University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
An expedition with Lindblad in Southeast Alaska shows the realities of climate change and uncovers the mysteries behind the "language" of rocks.
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
Visiting Scholar, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
How the next generation of naturalists can celebrate and protect the biodiversity of the canal that became a park in the heart of Washington, D.C.
Multiple alligators rest in grass beside a small body of water.

(Belle Long/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Patterns of U.S. land protection prioritize the great landscapes of the West over species richness or biodiversity, which are largely concentrated in the Southeast.

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