Biodiversity

plant grows by a marsh

A plant grows by a marsh at the Willow Waterhole Greenway Project. (Luz Rivera/FLICKR)

Northwestern University
Hybrid, nature-based infrastructure could help protect areas like Houston, Texas from floods, while providing other benefits for the community.
The George Washington University
Amongst a concrete jungle lies wildlife most of us have chosen to ignore, except this campus grounds manager and his university, who seek to redefine what it means to be on campus.
SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry
These wanted posters will be used to target specific populations in the affected areas to encourage public participation in invasive species surveying & management.
A call to research: Turtle Ants' threatened Cerrado biome
A call to research: Turtle Ants' threatened Cerrado biome
George Washington University
Biodiversity in the Cerrado of Brazil is threatened; learn about the researchers investigating Turtle Ants in this unique biodiversity hotspot.

A drake Mallard in the salt marshes of Long Island.

SUNY ESF
Wetland habitat loss is a major problem that affects the biodiversity of ecosystems.
The important life of a single species of endemic land snail
The important life of a single species of endemic land snail
SUNY-ESF
The fight for survival of one small, endemic land snail can show us the importance of protecting our world's biodiversity for generations to come.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Sewanee: The University of the South
Two research guides in northeast Madagascar founded their own nature reserves in their home villages, hoping to protect wildlife and their community in the face of climate change and deforestation.
Planet Forward Correspondent | GW Law School
Despite the devastating impacts of colonization, the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians have persevered in restoring their ecosystem and culture. Learn how the Kashia have lived in and managed the Sonoma County coastal environment for centuries.

From Andapa, the distant peaks of Marojejy National Park tower in the northeast, while a view to the southwest mounts Madagascar National Park’s Anjanaharibe-Sud Reserve on the horizon. Both parks are pockets of intact primary forest which house incredible biodiversity. (Vanessa Moss/Sewanee)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Sewanee: The University of the South
Surrounded by protected forest, residents of Ambodivohitra and land managers at the World Wildlife Foundation reveal how commodity crops and wood use affect on-the-ground conservation practices in the rainforests of northeast Madagascar.
George Mason University
James Mwenda climbs into the passenger seat of our Land Cruiser, a bushel of carrots swinging from his hand. “Jambo,” he says, flashing us a wide smile. “Ready to go?” When first welcoming our student group to Ol Pejeta Conservancy’s Endangered... Read More

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