Adaptation

The planet is changing. The cockroaches will be fine, but what about us? See what these PF Members are doing to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
The urban heat island effect is of increasing concern for cities around the world. But fear a little bit less--there are solutions in the works. 
Middlebury College
This profile piece highlights and celebrates the personal and political accomplishments of community member Fran Putnam. It shows the power of community organizing and individual climate initiatives.
The Little Guys- Lydia Cort
The Little Guys- Lydia Cort
SUNY Environmental science and forestry
My story looks at the life of small rural farmers, and how they will be affected by climate change.
Our Planet Forward storytelling team
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
On our latest storytelling expedition, four students traveled with Planet Forward and the FAO Liaison Office of North America to celebrate World Food Day at FAO headquarters in Rome and participate in CFS46.
Northwestern University
The last of three episodes, this podcast focuses on Florida Keys residents' opinions on sea level rise.
Northwestern University
The second of three episodes, this podcast focuses on the economic impacts of sea level rise in the Florida Keys.
Northwestern University
The first of three episodes, this podcast focuses on what sea level rise looks like in the Florida Keys and how it is being addressed.

On a traditional milpa farm, rows of agave are interspersed with other crops: pitaya-bearing cacti and ramón trees. (Evan Barnard/University of Georgia)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Georgia
Milpa is a type of sustainable farming historically practiced by the Maya in the Yucatán and other parts of Mesoamerica. The milpas, planted with numerous crops for local consumption, are facing challenges from climate change.
Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Nairobi is growing exponentially. Can urban farming help a city on track to reach 8.5 million people achieve a more food secure future?

Low-lying areas on Sapelo Island like Alligator Pond are susceptible to increased flooding during hurricanes and tidal surges. (Evan Barnard/University of Georgia)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Georgia
Hidden ecological and agricultural treasures lie off the coast of Georgia in Sapelo Island, where a group of African descendants have lived for centuries.

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