Adaptation

The planet is changing. The cockroaches will be fine, but what about us? See what these PF Members are doing to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi live in symbiosis with plant roots and are able to store up to 70 percent of organic carbon from leaf litter. (Mark Perkins/Flickr)

Assignment Editor, Planet Forward
In many cases microbes are already helping the planet in underrated ways. Technological developments and advanced genetic engineering make microbiological innovation a major player in climate change mitigation.

Tanzania. (Hailey Smalley/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Anthropogenic climate change is currently influencing rainfall and temperature patterns in East Africa. Here's everything you need to know about how East Africans are confronting these challenges.
Tanalian Mountain view

The view from the peak of Tanalian Mountain, which looks down on Port Alsworth. (Olivia Urbanski/Loyola University Chicago)

Loyola University Chicago
Planet Forward Correspondent Olivia Urbanski spent a summer interning at Lake Clark National Park as a Junior Ranger Intern to teach – and ultimately learn from – local children about environmental stewardship. 
Wil Burns

Wil Burns speaks at the Negative Emissions Workshop at George Washington University. (Marija Stefanovic/GWU)

State University College at Buffalo
Wil Burns is an expert in the field of environmental policy, with a research focus of climate geoengineering governance. Planet Forward sat down with Burns to discuss the Paris Climate Agreement and other climate change policies.

Dr. Tom Lovejoy beat the crowd of students, scientists, and storytellers to Camp 41 and waited to greet us as we entered our tropical home away from home. (Zachary G. B. Smith/SUNY)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Planet Forward led a student storytelling expedition to the Amazon. Hear Zack tell us about the trip we took to the Brazilian rainforest, which revealed research spanning 38 years — and the man behind it all.
SUNY ESF
The many-specied, woody, short rotation crop goes beyond use as a renewable biomass.

Kalu Yala is situated in Panama's Tres Brazos Valley. (Photos by Emma Sarappo)

Northwestern University
Real estate scion Jimmy Stice is looking to help the planet and mitigate climate change – through a startup. At his "eco-city" Kalu Yala, situated in Panama's Tres Brazos Valley, he's encouraging interns to learn to do the same.
Redefining progress
Redefining progress
University of Montana
This short film captures what progress symbolizes in the Alaskan Brooks Range.
The Silent Slide
The Silent Slide
SUNY-ESF
In the summer of 2016, a team of researchers were dropped off by helicopter in the back-country of Denali National Park. Like many scientific undertakings, it did not go as expected... One member of the trip was Kyle Turchick. This video portrays... Read More
SUNY ESF
By combining green solutions and community engagement with traditional water treatment methods, Save the Rain has put Syracuse on the cutting edge of a growing movement of environmentally conscious water management across the nation.

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