Adaptation

The planet is changing. The cockroaches will be fine, but what about us? See what these PF Members are doing to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

(Tuna Ölger/Pixabay)

SUNY-ESF Chief Sustainability Officer
The Road to COP26 | "It was with resolve that I started to work on climate-related issues, although I didn’t know at the time I was focused on what was an emerging existential crisis."
Three green and blue-faced salmon are shown close to the camera whilst swimming through clear water.

Pacific sockeye salmon during the annual migration. The Canadian government recently announced its (CAD) $647 million Pacific Salmon Strategy Initiative. “Hopefully it’s not too little, too late,” says marine campaigner Emmie Page (Image by Oregon State University/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en). 

Northwestern University
In June 2021, a heat wave spread over the Pacific Northwest, with people in the region wilting from record high temperatures. But, Fiona Skeggs reports, the threats are soaring for rivers and marine life as well.
Tractor in a lush field at sunset
Northwestern University
According to The Nature Conservancy, intense weather will transform hydrology, health, economics, and ecosystems in Illinois, as reported by Eva Herscowitz for Medill.
George Washington University
Marine scientists are using information collected by everyday people to monitor sharks in the face of climate change.

Fidan Karimova's reusable products are seen on her cloth napkin. (Arielle Bader/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Who says that individuals can’t make a positive change right in their own communities? Three women share their journeys to living a more sustainable lifestyle. 

The Cedars of God (‎Arz ar-Rabb "Cedars of the Lord") is one of the last vestiges of the extensive forests of the Lebanon Cedar, Cedrus libani, that once thrived across Mount Lebanon. (Paul Saad/Creative Commons 2.0)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Franklin & Marshall College
The cultural and ecological significance of cedar trees in Lebanon are at risk by the human negligence and anthropogenic climate change. It will take the work of grassroots organizations to work on conservation and restoration.
Lee Street Beach in Evanston, Illinois

This winter, popular Lee Street Beach in Evanston, Illinois, was shrinking as Lake Michigan rose. (Anne Snabes / Northwestern University)

Northwestern University
The Evanston, Illinois, and Beaufort, South Carolina, areas are considering how to combat beach erosion and planning to fix strained storm water systems.
Asian carp near Lake Michigan

Asian carp swarm waterways near the Great Lakes. (Source: U.S. Congresswoman Mary Kaptur)

George Washington University
Invasive species don't follow shelter in place orders like the officials tasked with containing them. For the Midwest's invasive Asian carp, the effects of halting prevention measures range from not too bad to detrimental.

Hundreds of Tucson residents are using green spaces during the pandemic like the Loop, a 131-mile paved bikeway that now sees hundreds of daily users. (Jake Meyers / University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Green spaces not only help cities mitigate and adapt to climate change; they can help residents cope with the shock of COVID-19.
Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Francis Wachira shows it is possible to end hunger and fight climate change through urban farming in Nairobi, Kenya.

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