Adaptation

The planet is changing. The cockroaches will be fine, but what about us? See what these PF Members are doing to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Zoe St. John farm tour

Kalu Yala agriculture director Zoe St. John discusses the food they are growing to feed the community. (Colin Boyle/Medill)

Northwestern University
Kalu Yala is host to small scale agroforestry in the Panamanian jungle — rows of alternating crops integrated with the natural environment, an image of the symbiosis that can exist between humans and the environment. Grace Wade reports for Medill.
local transportation is via boat

Traveling on boats is the main mode of transportation between islands of Guna Yala, and most are operated by local Guna people. (Luodan Rojas/Medill)

Northwestern University
Separated by miles of ocean and a 2-hour drive, or a 50-mile hike, through the jungle, Guna Yala and Kalu Yala are two of Panama’s most sustainable communities, but they also are starkly different. Medill's Luodan Rojas reports.
SUNY: College of Environmental Science and Forestry
An interview with Town Supervisor, Dave Jones, of Fenner looking into the Fenner Wind Farm.
SUNY-ESF
Synopsis of the recent New York State's Harmful Algal Bloom Summit hosted by SUNY-ESF in Syracuse, New York.
Dumpsters

Three large Dumpsters sit outside of University of Mississippi residence hall. (Bryce Johnson/University of Mississippi)

University of Mississippi
Many campuses across America are striving to achieve zero waste during move out.
SUNY ESF
The 'Alalā, or Hawaiian crow, has been extinct in the wild since 2002, but recent attempts at reintroduction are putting the species on the right path to a return to the wild.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
A look at how Ghanaians are reverting back to traditional storytelling in order to save the earth.
Algae bioreactors

Energaia's bioreactors on the Novotel rooftop. (Photo courtesy Energaia)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Microalgae could play a critical role in feeding a rapidly expanding global population.
Hangin with Grandfather Rocks
SUNY-ESF
Indigenous peoples are going to pave the way for a new system that honors the diverse ecosystems of the world as partners in economic and cultural well-being.

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