Adaptation

The planet is changing. The cockroaches will be fine, but what about us? See what these PF Members are doing to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

A field of shrubs under a cloudy sky.

Clouds hang low over Beaufort West, South Africa (Jaunita Swart/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Have we finally cracked the code on controlling the weather? A recent paper suggests that by using drones to charge up the water droplets in clouds, we can cause them to fall as rain.
Grayscale image of a flock of birds flying in an urban landscape

(Ian Battaglia/Unsplash)

The George Washington University
Sunnyvale, California recently began using lasers to deter large flocks of roosting crows. The effectiveness of these tools, however, can vary.
People in the midst of coastal vegetation pulling out invasive ice plants under a blue sky,

Photo taken by Big Sur Land Trust volunteer coordinator Jose Carlos at ice plant pulling event at Martin Dunes, California, on Feb. 19, 2022. (Photo courtesy Jose Carlos)

Middlebury College
In the face of the widespread presence of the ice plant along hundreds of miles of coastline, is there any hope that the California coastal ecosystem could ever be returned to its natural state?
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent
Endemic species exist in just one geographic location in the world, and the Galápagos Islands are home to many of them, fighting to survive in the place that inspired "survival of the fittest."
Moss-covered temple in Cambodia

This temple at Angkor Wat in Krong Siem Reap, Cambodia, shows how nature adapted to grow around a man-made structure. But how will humans adapt to changes in nature due to climate change? (James Wheeler/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Today is day nine of COP26, and the theme is adaptation, loss, damage, and resilience.

(Tuna Ölger/Pixabay)

SUNY-ESF Chief Sustainability Officer
The Road to COP26 | "It was with resolve that I started to work on climate-related issues, although I didn’t know at the time I was focused on what was an emerging existential crisis."
Three green and blue-faced salmon are shown close to the camera whilst swimming through clear water.

Pacific sockeye salmon during the annual migration. The Canadian government recently announced its (CAD) $647 million Pacific Salmon Strategy Initiative. “Hopefully it’s not too little, too late,” says marine campaigner Emmie Page (Image by Oregon State University/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en). 

Northwestern University
In June 2021, a heat wave spread over the Pacific Northwest, with people in the region wilting from record high temperatures. But, Fiona Skeggs reports, the threats are soaring for rivers and marine life as well.
Tractor in a lush field at sunset
Northwestern University
According to The Nature Conservancy, intense weather will transform hydrology, health, economics, and ecosystems in Illinois, as reported by Eva Herscowitz for Medill.
George Washington University
Marine scientists are using information collected by everyday people to monitor sharks in the face of climate change.

Fidan Karimova's reusable products are seen on her cloth napkin. (Arielle Bader/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Who says that individuals can’t make a positive change right in their own communities? Three women share their journeys to living a more sustainable lifestyle. 

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