Biodiversity

Dr. Tom Lovejoy beat the crowd of students, scientists, and storytellers to Camp 41 and waited to greet us as we entered our tropical home away from home. (Zachary G. B. Smith/SUNY)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Planet Forward led a student storytelling expedition to the Amazon. Hear Zack tell us about the trip we took to the Brazilian rainforest, which revealed research spanning 38 years — and the man behind it all.

(Planet Forward)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Planet Forward led a student storytelling expedition to the Amazon. Grad student Tomasz says the Quechua call the Amazon River 'Amaru Mayu,' which translates to 'mother serpent of the world.' What lessons can she teach us?
Planet Forward
The Planet Forward Storyfest 2017 storytelling expedition to Brazil brought together Storyfest winners, Planet Forward staff, storytellers, scientists, Correspondents and friends of Planet Forward for a once-in-a-lifetime journey.

(Photo courtesy Chris Palmer)

American University
Students at American University are using filmmaking as a tool to raise awareness about preserving and fostering vital ecosystems.

Bald eagle nest along the Chemung River. (Photos by Carrick Palmer)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
There’s something about bald eagles. Yes, they are our national bird and their symbology pervades our culture in many ways and places. But there’s something more to them. 
Environmental impact of the refugee crisis
Environmental impact of the refugee crisis
George Washington University
This video aims to shed some light on the environmental impact the refugee crisis and what we can do about it.
State University of New York: Environmental Sciences and Forestry
In order for us to save the loss of biodiversity in our world, we must start with what we can teach and save at home.
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Is agriculture inherently exploitative and destructive, or can we learn a new way from the traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous cultures?
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Agricultural management can destroy wildlife habitat, but ecological agriculture, like that practiced by indigenous peoples around the world, can provide both people and wildlife with the resources they need.

(Tomasz B. Falkowski/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Ecological disturbances have long been considered destructive, but in reality, can be an essential life-giving force that maintains ecosystem health.

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