Food

Eat better, smarter. Grow cleaner, more sustainable food. Great bumper stickers, but how do you do it? PF members offer their solutions on how use science and good practice to feed ourselves more sustainably.

Ambitions for a carbon-free impact and few emissions: At eco-town Kalu Yala, members of the community live as sparingly as possible, using what they can from the environment around them while replenishing what they can. (Candace Butera/Medill)

Northwestern University
Through a scientific process that seems almost magical, the creation of biochar takes you a step closer to reducing your carbon footprint. But this technique has a history that dates back further than you might think.
Northwestern University
One culinary intern at Kalu Yala used her time in Panama to improve her personal relationship with food and to get an example of a sustainable food system that contrasts the American food system.

Panama’s goat-like cows graze along the road to Kalu Yala. (Emma Sarappo/Medill)

Northwestern University
One sustainable jungle town in Panama hopes to repopulate iguanas in their natural habitat and begin using them as an alternative meat source to cows in the tropics.

Harper Simpson, former agriculture intern at Kalu Yala, wears jewelry to remind her to stay strong in times of hardship. (Cassandra Majewski/Medill)

Northwestern University
In a place so focused on environmental sustainability, an important caveat at the eco-town Kalu Yala is its struggle to create an environment that is mentally sustainable.
Planet Forward
Mandela Fellows Funmi Adebajo, Nana Boakye-Yiadom, and Rachel Kalera-Mhango shared their big ideas and the innovative ways in which they report and communicate.
Planet Forward
Planet Forward Founder Frank Sesno spoke with Katie Dotterer-Pyle, Shawn Lightfoot, and Chris Policinski about innovation at all levels, from farms to communities to corporations.
George Washington University
Community Health Centers provide a unique opportunity to help vulnerable populations adapt to climate change.

Thousands of sea turtles are killed by fishing nets each year.

The George Washington University
Bycatch, a topic you are not likely to hear in discussions of wasted food, is the non-target marine wildlife that is caught in fishing nets or on fishing lines and is then discarded either at sea or at port.
Mobile Agricultural Power Solutions
Where's the PUP now? Here's the story of what's happened with the Practical Utility Platform and the team since we won the Storyfest 2015 prize.
Umpqua Community College
Dr. Larry Winiarski and the Aprovecho Research Center are working to bring clean-burning and efficient cookstove technology to developing countries.

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